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SEEKING TO OBTAIN THROUGH PURCHASE OR TRADE:
The following Napoleonic era British swords: 1796 Heavy Cavalry Officers and Troopers swords; 1796 Light Cavalry Officers swords; 1803 Infantry Officers swords; Scottish Officers swords; any officers sword with Regimental device, markings, etc., on hilt or blade. Naval officers swords, dirks. (all the above must be in VG to fine or better condition and with scabbards, no restoration) Good examples of British military firearms pre-1898.

WANTED: Fine British Military Firearms, Pre-1898; also, British Military and Naval swords, Enlisted and Officer's Patterns. Also, Scottish and British Basket-Hilted Swords.

847) French M.1866-74 Gras Infantry Rifle. 32 1/2" barrel with various arsenal poincons, "1874 S 79" (constructed as needle-fire Chassepot 1874, modified to Gras 1879), bayonet bar # AB 93866 ( matching ramrod, bolt and all bolt parts, barrel near chamber, and stock - an all-matching gun).Receiver marked "MANUFACTURE D'ARMES / CHATELLERAULT" and "Mle 1866-74" (in this case, the "74" means the Model year the Gras was adopted). Right side buttstock carries Chassepot rondel dated 1874, left side the Gras modification rondel dated Sept. 1879 above serial # AB 93866. Along with the much-modified Chassepot bolt, the Chassepot chambers were fitted with an insert to handle the 11 X 59R Gras cartridge. Condition overall is excellent - retains all fine arsenal conversion blue on barrel and receiver, bolt has light age patina and much dried grease (easily cleaned). Bore bright and sharp as new. Ex. Working order. Stock solid, almost no dings, no cracks or repairs, never touched with deep clear conversion markings. Finding these much-used rifles in such great condition is getting hard these days - and moreover, many were converted to 8mm Lebel.

Reduced to $900

Note: Gun comes with a fine condition Model 1874 bayonet and scabbard
     Reduced to $900    
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980) A Large Greener (or Greener-type) Whaling Gun circa 1860. 36" long barrel, 3 1/2" wide at breech, approx. 1 3/4" bore. Brass action with hinged lid (rear tip of lid broken off), single large hammer fired by lanyard that passes through hole to underside of stock. Solid stock with reinforcing straps on handle/grip; brass plates at swivel bolt hole. Length overall 56" ; weight 75 lbs. No visible markings, barrel has uniform light pitting overall. Percussion lock appears to be in working order, has a powerful mainspring. I have not pulled it back to full cock for fear the original (and very tender) rope lanyard would tear apart rather than operate the sear. This action does not have the double nipples said to be a feature of Greener's guns. Whether this is a Greener or perhaps one of the very similar single-barrel guns made by Cordes & Rechten of Bremerhaven, Germany, circa 1856, I cannot say. In any event, it is a completely original c. 1860 whaling swivel cannon. PS: I know of one website where an original Greener harpoon alone is priced at $5550.00 . Incidentally, there is another site which provides quite good looking reproduction harpoons forged with the correct slotted shank with ring, at reasonable prices.   $4,000  
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1282) Black Watch Plaid Brooch. 3 1/2" in dia. Dates late 19th, early 20th century. St. Andrew on cross, battle honour Sphinx over "EGYPT". Motto "NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT" (both the regimental and Scotland's motto). Cast in white metal, with fine hand chased detail. Ex. condition.     Reduced to $300  
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1403) "Armurier et Arquebusier". 54 plates and text. Circa 1760 tome containing the full-size ( 10 X 15 1/2" ) military plates and text of Diderot's Encyclopedia. Plates illustrate gun manufacturing and tools; military musket components; 5 plates of infantry musket drill; 15 plates of complex infantry formations and evolutions (too many to picture all); Vauban fortification plans and siege methods; canno, mortars, carriages, siege weapons, etc. Marbled covers detached from spine, which has above title in gold letters. All plates and text pages are in fine condition     Reduced to $500  
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1466) British Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer's Sword with Unusual and Fine Quality Blade. 35", flat unfullered slightly curved blade with fine quality etching of "Crown over VR" scroll designs and maker/retailer "ANDREWS / 9 / PALL MALL / LONDON" , proof mark on obverse, back marked "PROVED". Steel guard, grip with original shagreen and silver wire wrap (wear to inboard/reverse shagreen indicates sword was carried a good deal). Steel scabbard, no dents, light pitting overall matching hilt. Blade is bright and clean, etching clear and sharp of the best quality. John and William Andrews occupied 9 Pall Mall from 1821 to 1868. With its heavy and flat-sided blade, this is obviously the choice of a cavalry officer with strong opinions regarding blade design.     Reduced to $600    
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1485) A Good Venetian Schiavona c. 1700. Broad, double-edged 34" blade etched both sides near forte with Imperial Austro-Hungarian double-headed eagle under crown. Fully-developed Type 2 Schiavona basket hilt with typical hollow cast pommel (a casting flaw has resulted long ago in the loss of a small piece on the obverse beside the typical hole that once held a link between the pommel and the top of the hilt). Hilt is still solid on the sword. Original wood grip bound with cord and retaining original shagreen covering. Both blade and hilt have untouched matching deep patina, generally smooth with absolutely no serious pitting anywhere. Blade is still fairly sharp. Completely original condition overall. Note well that fake Schiavonas are being offered by Euro dealers; I have seen several, and a surf on the web will reveal reproductions some of which, with a bit of artificial aging, could fool the unwary. This sword, however, is straight "out of the woodwork".
Other Schiavonas with the same Imperial eagle etched on the blade were not hard to find. One is illustrated in A.R. Dufty, "European Swords & Daggers in the Tower of London", pl.45a. It is dated 1734 above the crowned double-headed eagle (see my pics). Another is shown by Ewart Oakeshott, "European Weapons & Armour", pl.15c. Both of these swords I cite have the same Type 2 hilt as the one I offer here. It is perhaps worth noting that the Schiavoni (Slavonian mercenary soldiers in the pay of Venice) came from the Dalmatian coast of the Adriatic, an area that by the late 17th to early 18th centuries was bordered by the military frontier of the Austro-Hungarian Empire as it pushed the Turks out of Slavonia and Transylvania. Two Schiavonas are illustrated by Dr. Janos Kalmar, "Regi magyar fegyeverek", p.82, pl.103, Budapest National Museum. These swords were used by Slavonians employed by the Empire, and it is clear that Austrian blades became available to these men one way or another. An honest, all-original example.
   $3,500    
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1493) Western Balkan Silver Mounted Flint Pistol c. 1800. 12 1/2" round barrel, .63 cal., silver band and chiseled relief panel at breech stamped with Muslim armourer's punchmark; another, larger punchmark on left side breech; a typical illegible attempt at a European barrelsmith's signature appears on top of barrel. Well-made lock in fine working order with powerful springs, grooved frizzen face shows period wear, usual spurious European lock maker's markings. Solid stock is relief carved and silver wire inlaid, no cracks or repairs, engraved iron t.g. and sideplate, silver longspur engraved buttcap and embossed silver muzzle band. A genuine all-original Balkan fighting pistol from an extremely turbulent era.     Reduced to $800  
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1515) Blunt & Syms Pepperbox. 2 3/4", 6-shot fluted barrel cluster with crowned muzzles, .31 cal, stamped "6" on barrels and cylinder arbor screw. Engraved frame with flared butt. Fine working order. Grips retain 90%+ fine original varnish, slight chip missing both sides at rear of flared butt. Barrels retain 95% fine original blue, frame retains small amount original blue, remainder toned to very light smooth plum. Fine + condition overall.     Reduced to $1,100  
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1525) Large European 19th Century Crossbow. Strong steel bowstave 29" wide, overall stock length 39". Stock fitted at front with iron pivot slot for goats-foot type spanning lever; brass fore-end tip houses windage dial adjustable fore sight. Swiss-type elevating rear sight. Lock appears to be in working order, spring-loaded bowstring release hook snaps up when trigger is pulled. Solid, uncleaned, massive stock with brass mounts, no cracks or repairs. A good Flemish, German or Swiss crossbow for hunting or target. I previously offered this bow for $1600, but recently cleaned the brass (it was black with patina), and have now lowered the price   $1,250  
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1548) A Fine Silver Stocked Albanian Miquelet Pistol c. 1800. 13 3/4" , .60 cal. barrel. Engraved lock stamped with maker's punchmark, ex. crisp working order. Solid, heavy silver stock of fine workmamship, extensively decorated by engraving and chisel-work. A fine example and all original.   $2,250    
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1580) A Rare French Officer's Presentation Sword dated 1828. 30" blade etched on back "MANUFre ROYALE DE KLINGENTHAL Str 1828 S.A." and in large letters in the obverse fuller "DONNE PAR LE ROI" (Given by the King). Blade retains much original polish, all etching sharp and clear as new. Brass hilt retains 10 - 15% gilding, leather covered grip missing brass wire except for a few turns near pommel. About 700 or so of these presentation Model 1821 Infantry Officers swords were given to graduating officers of the Ecoles Militaires from 1822 to 1830. Steel scabbard with mostly smooth dark age patina, 3 small dents on reverse near drag. Untouched VG condition.   $600  
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1605) A Fine Pattern 1857 Royal Volunteer Engineer's Sword. 32" blade etched with Crown, "VR", cannon, "VOLUNTEER / ENGINEERS" with corps badge, retailer "ALGAR / & WOOD / WARRINGTON". Blade retains all original bright polish, etching like new/mint (has 2 tiny edge nicks that are so small they do not detract). Brass guard retains all original gilding, is undented, ex. to mint condition; grip retains all original shagreen and wire wrap in ex. condition. Original buff leather throat washer. Iron scabbard with smooth age patina, no dents whatever. A handsome and distinctive sword in ex.+ condition.     Reduced to $700    
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1608) Indian Katar, 17th - 18th Century. 12" triple-fullered blade cut down from Firangi (European) sword blade. Areas of guard chiseled with foliage patterns, remainder pierced with myriad small square holes. Shows fine workmanship and great age, though metal is generally smooth overall.   $675  
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1609) Good Indian Suit of Mail and Plate Armour. Composed of alternate rows of solid and riveted links, four large breast plates with lace loops, smaller plates at sides and five rows of overlapping scales on back These scales overlap each other by two-thirds, ensuring that any thrust or cut must penetrate the thickness of two layers. The suit's links are graduated in thickness and diameter, heavier on the upper body and becoming lighter towards the bottom (where there would be leg armour as well), and on the lower arms. There is an inscription on the upper right breastplate. Its type and location suggests this may have come from the known group of 16th and 17th century suits captured by Anup Singh, Maharajah of Bikaner, when, acting as the General of the Mogul Emperor Aurangzeb's army, he took by siege the Fortress of Adoni in 1689.
This generall style of mail, plate, and scale armour was widely popular from Turkey, Eastern Europe including Russia, Persia, Central Asia, and India for centuries. Condition is VG, suit is intact and complete.
     Reduced to $1,800  
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1641) Colt Single Action Army .45. 7 1/2" barrel, 45LC cal., marked "COLT'S PT. F.A. MFG. Co HARTFORD CT. U.S.A.". Frame with 3 patent lines. All matching numbers 91761 (made 1883), cylinder matching # 1761, barrel numbered 1761 under ejector housing. Fine unbuggered screw heads. Ex. working order and indexing, bore fine and clean, bright with sharp, clear rifling, just some very light frosting barely visible here and there in the grooves. All metal smooth, mostly blue turned plum patina, no pitting, edges and markings sharp and clear. Original solid wood grip, no cracks, chips or repairs, fit perfectly and obviously original to gun, retain about 40-50% original varnish. Factory letter (comes with gun) states gun shipped May 10, 1883, to Hartley and Graham, New York. While barrel length is not stated, Colt letter states this is because 7 1/2" was considered standard at this relatively early time in production, and unnecessary to record. A nice, clean, 100% correct,never played with, and all-original Colt.   $5,000    
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1658) Webley Model 1883 Police Revolver. 2 1/2", .450 cal. barrel with Birmingham proofs, correct German silver foresight. 6-shot cylinder with Bir. proofs in flutes, face stamped ".450" and "892" (last 3 digits of SN on frame). Frame marked with serial # "88892 , .450 / POLICE / WEBLEY'S / handcuffed hands / M.P. /1430" and Bir. proof. Topstrap marked "P.WEBLEY & SON / LONDON and BIRMINGHAM". Solid uncleaned checkered grip, no cracks or repairs, several shallow pressure marks on right side. Ex. crisp like new working order and indexing; ex.+ bright bore with sharp rifling. Metal retains 20% original bright blue, remainder smooth honest service wear with a small areas very light pepper-salt. This exact model was derived from the famous RIC revolver, and adopted by the Metropolitan London Police in 1883, as well as by many other police forces throughout the Empire. The # 1430 is the issue # of some police force, so well-stamped I believe it was applied by Webley as part of the order. Regarding the handcuffed wrists, I quote from Dowell's "The Webley Story", p.66 "....the frame is stamped with the Webley trade mark depicting a pair of handcuffed hands. This trade mark was used on weapons issued to police forces"; see also pl.38c for the identical model."     Reduced to $1,100  
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1667) Cased Pair of Italian Double Barrel Pistols c. 1850. 6 1/2" , .69 cal. barrels with hook breeches retain much original genuine twist finish, ribs engraved "A.SCARPATI NAPOLI". Back-action locks engraved "A.SCARPAT" (obverse; "NAPOLI" (reverse). All four locks in ex. crisp like new working order; nipples show no wear. Fine+ stocks, never cleaned, no restoration, ex. checkered grips, engraved steel mounts smooth with no pitting. Buttcaps are spring-loaded to swivel sideways to provide storage for spare caps. Original brass tipped ramrods with threaded ends.
Cased retains fine original green baize lining. Original mold, cleaning tools and steel rod threaded to accept wire brush and steel jag. Screwdriver missing. Three fitted brass boxes for wads, caps, and bullets. Sixteen holes, 11 at front and 5 at back, to hold prepared paper cartouches, providing four reloads for both guns. This explains the lack of a powder flask or a space to hold one. Leather tabs allow entire compartmented interior to be removed from case. Case fitted on both ends with flush-fitted folding brass handles. Case exterior has several grain cracks, scratches, small bit of veneer missing from one bottom corner, though overall condition is good. A gunmaker named Scarpati is dated as working in Naples 1770-92; while obviously he could not have made these pistols, he is likely an ancestor.
Suitable for a traveling gentleman or military officer, these pistols date from an era of turmoil in Italy, the time of Garibaldi and Risorgimento, and eventual unification as the Kingdom of Italy in 1861."
     Reduced to $3,600    
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1673) British Indian Army Mountain Artillery Senior NCO's Sword. 30" strongly curved blade with 10" back edge, is identical in form to British Mountain Artillery Pattern 1896. Stamped with maker's mark "JOHN ROUND & SON / LIMITED / SHEFFIELD" , this mark partly overstruck with date '8 '15 (possibly '13) and inspector's stamp. Obverse with Broad Arrow and twice struck Crown over 1D over E ( I'm pretty sure it's "1D" and not "ID"). John Round & Son Limited is listed in Sheffield at Tudor St. from 1874 to 1932 as a "Silversmith, Electroplater, Knife and Swordmaker" (R.H. Bezdek, "Swords and Sword Makers of England and Scotland", p.214). Hilt is of some base metal, probably brass, non-magnetic, heavily silver plated. The silver shows virtually no wear, though it is tarnished black in some areas. Grip covered in shagreen, bound with silver and copper wire. Tang button is undisturbed. Blade is smooth, no pitting just light patina; grip and guard are ex. condition, showing no appreciable wear. I am not entirely certain of my attribution, but the hilt has the subtle look of the Indian Army version of the 1821 L.C. guard. Combining this with the date (1913 or 1915), the Crown ownership and the form of the blade, plus the quality silver plate, I conclude it to be a sword of a senior NCO of the Indian Mountain Artillery.    $450  
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1686) Webley RIC Pattern Revolver issued to Toronto Police Force. 3 1/2" barrel, correct german silver fore sight, Birmingham proofs. Frame with Bir. proof, marked on reverse side "TPF" (Toronto Police Force) in large engraved letters (this is a known group), "525", Webley trade mark of Winged Bullet over "W&S", "WEBLEY'S / R.I.C. / No.1.442 CF" over serial # 101748 (matching # 748 on rear of cylinder). The "525" is likely a TPF number, continuing a ledger record of guns that began long before this order to Webley, and from the look of it, stamped by Webley from a block of numbers sent by the police. Top strap stamped "P.WEBLEY & SON / LONDON & BIRMINGHAM". Crisp, like new working order and indexing, bright nearly mint bore and chambers, overall retains 85% original bright blue. Grip ex.+, looks almost new, shows no wear, dents, cracks or repairs. Revolver is in ex. all original condition.    $1,850    
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1690) Scottish Basket Hilt c. 1640-50. 33" backsword blade stamped both sides in twin fullers "XX ANDRIA XX / XX FARARA XX". Iron hilt with simple line engraving on junction plates, no breaks, repairs or missing elements (note that these hilts never had a quillon, Scots: "back ward"). Original grip of early type, 4-sided with chamfered edges, tapered at both ends. Wormed but solid, still bears marks of long-lost original wire wrap; at the top of the grip, sandwiched between the wood and pommel, is trapped a small remnant of the original multi-coloured wool fringe. This form of grip is also often seen on West Highland Ribbon Hilts/Beaknose Swords, when (very rarely) they retain their original grips. In a very rare survival, this sword retains its original thick buff leather liner, which bears the dark impressions made by the bars of the guard. This guard is identical in typological development with sword # 23, "Scottish Swords & Dirks" by John Wallace; it fits in the same group illustrated by C.Mazansky "British Basket Hilted Swords" examples D8 to D10 that he dates from c. 1600 to later 17th century. Further, the three swords illustrated by David Blackmore "Arms & Amour of the English Civil Wars" pp.30-31 also have baskets of this same type, but their pommels are English in form. One of these so-called "Irish" hilted examples was excavated at the site of Basing House, destroyed in 1645. Completely original in all respects, no restoration or repairs. Ex. Ken Drake collection.    $4,000    
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1693) English Silver Mounted Hanger circa 1697. 19" curved, single fuller blade marked both sides with Solingen Running Wolf, blade smooth with just small areas scattered light pitting. Silver mounted hilt with staghorn grip in ex. condition, no cracks, repairs or any restoration. Knuckle bow stamped with "lion's head erased" and figure of seated Britannia introduced in 1697 to replace old silver marks and indicate a raised standard for sterling, compulsory until 1719 when the old marks and old standard for sterling returned. The maker's mark appears to be "KN", and though the date letter shows wear, it is likely that for 1697. A fine, all-original hanger with no restoration or damage, of a type much favoured by Naval officers of the period - see pic of Vice Admiral Thomas Hopsonn.      Reduced to $1,500    
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1694) An Impressive French Hunting Dagger, Second Half 18th Century. 12 1/2" strongly curved, thick and heavy (to function as cleaver), 2 1/8" wide blade with pronounced clip point, of excellent workmanship to rival the best of any bladesmith's work. Smooth with no pitting and just small areas of light surface stain. Original green baize throat washer. Hilt with high quality brass mounts, finely hand chased and engraved, retain small traces of original gilding, ebonized spiral carved original grip capped with pommel ensuite with cross-guard. Brass mounted, leather covered wood scabbard retains 99% original leather with some slight surface scuffing that does not detract from the dramatic effect of the dagger which is in fine condition, no repairs or restoration, impressive in style, quality, weight and condition.      Reduced to $2,000  
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1700) Wilkinson Officer's 1821 Light Cavalry Saber of the 8th Irish Hussars. 34 1/2 blade, etched profusely with battle honours on reverse "LESWARREE, HINDOSTAN, ALMA, INKERMAN, BALAKLAVA, SEVASTOPOL, CENTRAL INDIA" Harp surmounted by Crown, and "THE KING'S / 8th / ROYAL / IRISH HUSSARS". On blade shoulder "HENRY / WILKINSON / PALL MALL / LONDON". Obverse etched with scrolls, "CROWN over VR", owner's arms and motto "LABES PEJOR MORTE" of Captain Horace Durrant. Back of blade numbered 13108 (made 1864). Wilkinson ledger copy accompanies sword confirming sold to "DURRANT ESQ." in 1864, "LIGHT CAVALRY" blade embossed by "ROWE" , who was head etcher at Wilkinsons's , and the quality - and condition - of the blade is superb. Regulation steel guard retains all original shagreen and wire wrap on grip. Condition of blade is ex., bright with all etching sharp and clear, very slight spots of minor pitting near point. Hilt and scabbard bear matching light dull steel patina, scabbard has one or two very small dents near reverse drag. Overall condition is fine, blade ex. and bright. Horace Durrant entered service as a cornet in the Bengal Light Cavalry, and afterwards was appointed Lieutenant and Adjutant to the Bodyguards of Governors General and Lord Canning, and served with them during the Mutiny. He volunteered his services for the Persian War, but Lord Canning declined to detach any of his officers from the Bengal Presidency due to rumours of disaffection amongst the native troops. On July 17, 1863, Durrant exchanged into the 8th Hussars as Captain, and sold out in 1866. He was gazetted in 1869 as Captain and Adjutant to the 1st West York Regiment of Yeomanry Cavalry. Ten years before this sword was made, the 8th Irish Hussars were one of the regiments participating in the famous "Charge of the Light Brigade" at Balaklava, where they suffered loss of 65 men out of 104 that went into action.    $1,200    
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1711) British Pattern 1899 Cavalry Saber with Rare Experimental Leather and Wood Scabbard. 33 1/2" blade marked "EFD" (Enfield), Broadarrow, dated ' 01 (1901). Steel guard with overall even light pitting, stamped "EFD" with inspector's stamp, checkered leather grips in fine condition. Scabbard in fine+ condition, made with wood body fitted with a 4" steel upper mount with two fixed rings, and a 6" steel drag, the whole covered with leather from throat to the barely exposed drag (a magnet revealed the lengths of the steel mounts). Leather is in fine sound condition, perfect intact seam, shows little wear, stamped on back near ring with inspectors' stamps, date " ' 01" , "99" (pattern), "EFD". Blade is ex.+ with nearly all original polish. A rare experimental type developed in light of South African War experience. See Robson, "Swords of the British Army", Revised edition, p.57, for an account of the production of these scabbards, apparently for troop trials.    $650  
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1716) Massive Zeiss Made Dutch Army Artillery Rangefinder. 33" end to end, many brass knobs, dials, etc. A brass plaque reads "NEDINSCO / 'S GRAVENHAGE / SYSTEM / CARL ZEISS / JENA". The various dials, etc., are in Dutch. Leather pads at ends are in fine condition. Box is original with modern brass latch. Probably made 1930's, but maybe earlier. A heavy (25 lbs), beautifully made precision instrument that must have cost a fortune in its day. With folding tripod clamp for field service.    $250  
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1717) An All-Steel Highland Pistol by Nock, London. 6", .46 cal. engraved barrel with swamped muzzle, engraved "LONDON". Engraved lock with roller frizzen spring, maker "NOCK". Engraved, hollow iron stock fitted with belt hook, "ram's horn" butt with threaded vent prick. Original ramrod. Lock is in ex. crisp working order, of fine quality as one would expect from a maker of Samuel Nock's abilities, nephew and apprentice of Henry Nock. Samuel Nock worked from 1805 to his death in 1852. As the pistol is in flint, it would suggest a date early in the "Highland Revival", probably 1820-25. It certainly had a mate, and was probably cased with a dirk, claymore and various accoutrements. Smooth clean metal overall, clearly always cared for, of fine quality and robust reliability. Entirely original in all respects.    $4,650    
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1721) An Excellent Model 1858 Starr DA .44 Revolver. 6" barrel, .44 cal. Frame marked right side "STARR'S PATENT JAN. 15 1856", left side "STARR ARMS CO. NEW YORK". Many parts have small "in house" inspectors' letters like "W" or "H". Matching serial # 7910 on cylinder and frame. Ex.+ grip, no cracks or repairs, clear inspectors' cartouches both sides. Action in perfect crisp working order, like new. Bore is bright mint. Overall gun retains 90% original brilliant blue. Cylinder has flaked to smooth light plum with patches of bright blue, much blue in rebated area around the perfect nipples and the chambers retain nearly all their blue. Hammer and loading lever retain ex. case colors. All screwheads in perfect shape. A great example, 100% original.      Reduced to $3,200  
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1722) Excellent Cased Model 1867 Mk II Adams Revolver. 6" barrel, .450 CF cal., top marked "ADAMS PATENT SMALL ARMS Co 331 STRAND LONDON" , stamped with tiny London view and proof marks. Cylinder with London proofs, serial # 4703 which matches #4703 stamped on frame. Right side frame "ADAMS PATENT" in oval, Adams "TRADE MARK" near grip. Action in perfect like new working order, chambers and bore mint bright. Ex.+ to mint grip, no cracks, chips, or repairs, crisp unworn checkering. Gun retains 98% perfect bright original blue. There is a small flaked area on front of trigger guard, slight wear to blue on part of the front edge of the cylinder. Perfect screw heads. Case contains cleaning rod, screwdriver, glass oil bottle. Original ex. green baize lining. Original trade label depicts this Mk II Model, gives extensive operating instructions, notes the Adams adopted by H.M. War Dept., London Police, etc. Case in fine condition, never refinished, has a partial grain crack in wood of bottom, otherwise no damage. An outstanding condition gun and case. 100% original in all respects.    $4,500    
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1733) Cased British Double-Action Tranter model 1856 Revolver. 6", .54 bore (.44 cal.) barrel, Bir. proofs, loading lever stamped "TRANTER'S PATENT". Frame marked "No. 13714.T.", "TRANTER'S PATENT", 5-shot cylinder with Bir. proofs. Spring-loaded cylinder pin retainer, and safety lever to lock cylinder in intermediate position between nipples. Action in ex. crisp working order, double or single action. Checkered grip in ex. condition, no cracks or repairs.. Bore is ex., bright with sharp rifling. Overall gun retains 80%+ ex. bright original blue(note that Tranter cylinders received a dull gray casehardening, not blue), remaining surface smooth plum patina. Gun is overall Very Fine to Ex. Case retains all original green baize lining. Original double cavity mold stamped "TRANTER'S PATENT"; ex. condition original bag flask with adjustable spout; original screwdriver and nipple wrench; original pewter oil bottle stamped on bottom "JAMES DIXON / & SONS / SHEFFIELD / 202 P"; original Joyce cap box w/caps; original canister of "TRANTER'S / PATENT / LUBRICATION COMPOSITION" with much original lube inside; 12 original bullets covered with white lead oxide. Case in good solid condition with two pivoting locking hooks, but missing brass lid escutcheon and lock bezel.      Reduced to $3,500  
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1735) Irish Coaching Blunderbuss by Willet, Dublin. 14 3/4" heavy, part oct. barrel with large bell mouth 1 5/8" bore at muzzle, 2 1/8" bell, private proofs, engraved "DUBLIN" on top flat. Fine untouched lock in ex. working order, engraved "WILLET" ( Henry Willet, Dublin, worked 1781 - 1810. Stockel, p.1388). Fine+ uncleaned stock with only a few minor dings (thin short grain crack ahead of lock, scarcely visible no wood replaced or repaired), brass mounts, original rammer, made with sling bar and ring. This indicates use by a mounted man, possibly a postillion, or perhaps, a guard seated beside the driver. The particularly wide muzzle would help in reloading from a swaying coach seat or postillion's saddle. A sharp, un-messed with blunderbuss.    $3,400    
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1740) Walker's "Excelsior" IV Ship's Log. Cased in original wood box, the log consists of an 11" long 4-bladed brass rotor (partly painted black) designed to be streamed behind the "Yacht, Motor Launch, or Fishing Craft" from an outrigger, the line attached to a gimbaled brass dial recorder fitted with a red painted iron flywheel. It appears to be in operating order, and the dial face is clean and shows no corrosion or fading. The set includes an oil can with label "Ship-Log Oil". All original and complete.    $150  
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1745) French Model 1836 Senior Gendarmerie Officer's Pistol. 5", .60 cal. damascus stripe barrel polygroove rifled "en chevaux" (hair rifling). Lock engraved "MANUFre de / CHATELLERAULT / C.T.& Cie"; in ex.crisp working order. Solid uncleaned stock, no cracks or repairs, iron mounts, hinged trapdoor in butt, checkered grip in fine condition. Original ramrod. VG+ overall, untouched. The flared checkered grip, the more elaborate fore end tip and the damascus barrel mark it as made for a senior officer.    $850  
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1761) Hanoverian Jaeger Rifle c. 1840. Heavy, 29 3/4" barrel, .66 cal., rifled with 8 deep grooves. Bore in VG - Fine condition. Original brass foresight, single blade rear sight. Octagonal at breech for 5", then round to muzzle. Barrel is of genuine twist and all the pattern remains, just slightly dulled. Back-action lock with pivoting hammer block, ex. crisp working order, including double set triggers, marked "TANNER / IN HANNOVER". Lock and trigger plate retain muted case colors. Solid brass mounted stock in fine uncleaned condition, no cracks or repairs, original sling swivels and thick wood rammer. Buttplate tang numbered "10". Round patchbox engraved with Crown over "GR". Overall condition is fine+, untouched. I reproduce a page from a German publication that I received with the rifle, showing and giving specs of the Hanoverian Model 1837 Jaeger Rifle - the relationship of the two rifles is obvious. The Model 1837 illustrated is made by Tanner also, and apparently Tanner submitted this successful design in the Trials. The lines of the stock, cheek rest, pistol grip, thick wood rammer, are identical. It also has a hammer block. However, the Model 1837 used a front-action lock, had a large rectangular patchbox, different placement of the sling swivels and a bayonet bar. This "GR" rifle never had a bayonet bar - the smooth and continuous pattern of the twist at the muzzle prove this beyond doubt. Bayonet bars were brazed or welded on to flats cut into the barrel and simply cannot be removed, however carefully, without leaving traces of the fact, especially on genuine twist damascus barrels. The military lines and the Royal "GR" cypher on the patchbox indicate Crown ownership. The previous owner was aware that Hanover remained a dynastic property of the British Royal House when the Elector of Hanover became George I of England in 1714 (Hanover had its status raised from Electorate to Kingdom in 1815). Although Hanover was not considered the property of England, all the British Kings from George I to William IV retained sovereignty over Hanover. However, George IV died in 1830, a date I consider too early for this rifle. William IV became King of England and ruler of Hanover from 1830 to 1837 - but this is clearly not a "WR". William died in 1837 and was succeeded by Victoria. The new Queen was debarred from becoming Queen of Hanover by Salic Law, which excluded a female ruler. To solve the problem, Victoria's uncle, the Duke of Cumberland, left England and became King George of Hanover (1837-51), and hence the "GR" on the patchbox cover. When King George died, he was succeeded by his son, George, who reigned until Hanover picked the wrong side in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 for supremacy in the German lands and was annexed by Prussia in that year. Entirely original and in Fine+ condition.

NOTE: Carl Daniel Tanner, Hanover, 1791-1858, was Court Gunmaker = "Hofrustmeister"
     Reduced to $2,400  
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1763) Cased Third Model Tranter Revolver. 6", 54 bore (.44 cal.) barrel, engraved muzzle, Birmingham proofs, third model loading lever stamped (TRANTER's / PATENT). Frame # 12765T, spring loaded cylinder pin release. 6-shot cylinder with Birmingham proofs. Tranter double trigger stamped "TRANTER's / PATENT". Ex. working order and indexing, double or single action, like new operation. Grip in ex. condition, no cracks or repairs. Frame and barrel are, like all early Tranters, one piece, with engraving, retain 95% original bright blue. Bore rates as fine, bright with some minor frosting. Ex. overall, complete and all original. Fine case in ex.condition, all original lining. Ex. undented flask by "C & JW / HAWKSLEY", original nipple wrench, original mold stamped with Tranter's mark, original large canister with label "W. TRANTER's LUBRICATING BULLETS" (empty) ; another labeled "W.TRANTER's LUBRICATING COMPOSITION" with much decayed grease still inside; "F.JOYCE & Co PERCUSSION CAPS". Original wood and brass cleaning rod. All accessories in fine condition. A fine example in all respects.     Reduced to $3,900    
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1765) A Fine Caucasian / Cossack Pistol "Topantcha", late 18th to mid-19th century. 13", .60 cal. barrel of genuine twist damascus (faded but visible), struck at breech with two armourer's marks in Arabic, gold inlay at breech and star fore sight. Barrel has well-executed chiseled decoration - the three narrow near full length ribs are dead straight. Tang covered in fine quality gold damascene en suite with lock. All screw heads and button trigger also with gold decoration. Miquelet lock of typical Persian-Caucasian type, all surfaces covered with gold damas, in crisp ex. working order with powerful springs. Original leather covered stock completely intact with only minor wear. Pierced silver side plate, silver niello barrel bands and grip pommel. All gold damas is 98% intact. Three small studs in the stock near the tail of the lock once secured a brocade covered leather pad to protect the trigger finger from accidental (and painful) contact with the mainspring as it snaps the cock. These pads rarely survive, but can be seen on two very similar Caucasian pistols illustrated in Claude Blair's "Pistols of the World", plates 810 and 811 (these pistols in the Bernisches Historisches Museum, Bern). A fine quality and all-original pistol.    $3,600    
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1769) Wilkinson Pattern 1897 Royal Northumberland Fusiliers (5th of Foot) Officer's Sword. 32 3/4" blade etched with scrolls, "VR", Royal Arms, etc., owner's initials "WG" for William Gibson, serial # 38354 (year 1900). Blade is in fine condition, small areas of staining that do not detract, all markings very clear, much original polish. Guard bears the flaming bomb / St. George and the Dragon symbol of the 5th of Foot; note that only 3 variations of the standard 1897 hilt were authorized - this Northumberland pattern, and those of the Lancashire Fusiliers and the South Wales Borderers. Grip retains all fine original shagreen and silver wire wrap. Original sword knot. Scabbard is early field service type with large nickel plated mounts, leather in fine condition, no repairs, seam intact. Sword is contained in its original leather case embossed with Gibson's initials, also in fine condition. The Wilkinson ledger details # 38354 "Infantry", buyer "W. Gibson" and regiment "1st Oxford Lt. Infty Voltrs". At the time he purchased the sword, William Gibson was commissioned in the 1st Oxfordshire (Oxford University) Rifle Volunteer Corps, by 1887 known as Oxford University Volunteers, functioning as an officer training unit. In 1901, Gibson transferred to the 5th of Foot (see London Gazette May 3, 1901 - this and all other document copies mentioned come with sword). This would be when he sent the sword back to Wilkinson for the Northumberland Fusilier badge to be afixed in the same manner as all other R.N.F. swords. Gibson served as a 2nd Lt. with the first Battalion during the Second Boer War, and was severely wounded at Yzer Spruit on Feb.25, 1902. His rise in rank is also well documented, Captain R.N.F. 1913, Major R.N.F. 1916, Lt. Col. London Regiment 1917, etc.   $1,200    
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1771) American Arms Co. Double Barrel O/U Deringer. 3" barrels, one .32 RF the other .22 RF. Barrels rotated by hand, pulled forward to eject shells. Top of .32 barrel marked "WHEELER'S PAT. OCT. 31 1865", the .22 barrel "AMERICAN ARMS Co. BOSTON, MASS.". Barrels retain 35% original blue, balance fading to smooth plum. Bores have strong, bright rifling with some scattered light pitting. Action is crisp and positive, barrel lock-up tight, brass frame # 603 retains 10% or so original nickel. Grips are fine+, retain 95% smooth original varnish, some slight dings on bottom edges. VG+ overall.      Reduced to $700  
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1772) Pair of Elliptical Muzzle Flint Pistols with Spring Bayonets circa 1790-1800. 4 1/2" barrels; elliptical muzzle approx. 3/4" X 1". Engraved actions signed "JEAN RAINKIN" , Liege maker 1766 - 1836. Ex. working order, smooth metal overall with some light staining, sliding safeties retain brilliant blue. Silver wire inlaid grips with checkered backs, one grip has thin crack on right side about 1/4" deep that does not go through the 1" thick stock which is quite solid.     Reduced to $3,000    
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1774) Turkish / Balkan Yataghan. 22 3/4" blade with inlaid silver Arabic script. Though I make no pretense to read Arabic, certain characters are employed so often the collector learns to recognize them - in this case those for "the work of" (followed by the maker's name, and "the possession of" (followed by the owner's name). Also, it id dated 122? . The last numeral missing because of some inconvenient pitting. Thus the date could be from 1220 AH to 1229 ( AD April 1, 1805 to Dec.24, 1813 ). Certainly a dating of the early 19th century is entirely likely for this weapon. The hilt is a heavy and large eared affair of very good quality workmanship. It is of an alloy that gives it a somewhat golden hue. Note that a thin (the width of the blade's back) one inch long piece is missing at the blade/hilt join. No other damage or repairs, blade generally smooth with some scattered light pitting.   $750  
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1782) Wilkinson 1821 L.C. Pattern Sword of the 10th Hussars, property of Lord William Cavendish-Bentinck. 35" blade etched with Prince of Wales plumes over X / R.H. (Tenth Royal Hussars), Victorian cypher both sides, owner's name "WILLIAM BENTINCK", Wilkinson address and serial # 30364. As is unfortunately sometimes the case, the Wilkinson ledger records no purchaser's name - it may well have been ordered and picked up by Lord Bentinck's tailor. Hilt is of late 1821 pattern, made 1890. Entering the regiment from the militia, Bentinck became a lieutenant in the 10th Hussars in 1889, using his militia sword until this one could be obtained shortly thereafter. Blade ex., retains most original polish, no pitting, all etching sharp and clear. Hilt also ex., shagreen covering and wire wrap ex. Scabbard undented, with areas of light pitting. Lord Bentinck's service in the Boer War was active; he is one of only a few officers mentioned in the regimental history (see pics of documents). "They scarcely completed their business with the Landdrost.... Lord William Bentinck....." For his excellent sustained service, Lord Bentinck became a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order in 1901.

Note: In Ron Bester's "Small Arms of the Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902", p.79, the author states "Then in 1896, new regulations stipulated that all cavalry officers should wear the sword which the heavy cavalry officers already wore, the honeysuckle one, although many light cavalry officers commissioned before 1896 carried their earlier pattern of sword in the Anglo-Boer War".
   $1,150    
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1783) A Fine and Early Royal Artillery Officer's Sword by Wilkinson. 35 1/2" blade with fine quality etching of Royal Arms over "VR" , "UBIQUE" Wilkinson address, "ROYAL ARTILLERY" , owner's family crest and motto "AD ASTRA SEQUOR" encircling a rampant lion. These are the exact arms of the Tottenham family. Serial # 5194 on back of blade. Hilt bears a smooth dark patina matching scabbard, retains all original shagreen and wire wrapping. Scabbard in fine condition, just several minor dings near drag. Blade is excellent, retains most original polish, etching like new, few minor spots of light pitting. An inquiry to Richard Milner (who possesses the original Wilkinson ledgers) revealed that the entry against #5194 simply says "Six Royal Artillery swords made for stock". I was not charged for this information, by the way. This sword was made in 1854, the start of the Crimean War, and the first year that Henry Wilkinson began to serial number his blades, starting the enumeration at 5000. Thus this is the 194th Wilkinson sword to receive a serial number. An impressive sword in fine condition, with a blade somewhat larger than usual.   $1,200    
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1784) British Cutlass from the Hudson's Bay Company Side Wheel Steamer "Labouchere". 29" curved, flat sided blade with 9" false edge. All-brass hilt (guard and grip), engraved "LABOUCHERE". Retains original leather washer. Untouched condition, blade mostly smooth age dark with absolutely no serious pitting. Brass hilt with deep age patina slightly lighter on grip from handling. Untouched tang button/peen. The form of this cutlass follows that of the Royal Navy's Pattern 1845 cutlass, though the Navy's cutlass had an all-iron, black painted hilt. It is exactly the sort of cutlass you would expect to find in a British merchant ship's arms locker of this era. Built in 1858 at Greens in the Blackwall yards of London, the Labouchere steamed her way to the Vancouver Island port of Victoria. She engaged in trade with West Coast Indian tribes, Russian America, and carried miners to the Fraser and Cariboo country, as well as passengers up and down the North West coast. In 1862, the Labouchere was seized by the Tlingit Indians during a confrontation between the crew and the natives over what both parties apparently considered dishonest and unfair trade practices (see article in "Journal of the West", Oct. 1994. I was unable to locate a copy). Following her release, Labouchere continued to ply her trade up and down the coast. On April 14, 1866, she departed San Francisco for Victoria, only to hit the reef off Point Reyes in heavy fog that night. Backing off the reef, Labouchere fought to stay afloat and re-enter San Francisco habour in the morning light. But the pumps and damage control were unable to save her, and she went down on the morning of April 15 with the loss of only two lives.

Completely original and untouched.

Note to # 1784. Appearing in Lewis & Drydens "Marine History of the Pacific North West" , from the log of the Labouchere " At Hoonah, Saturday, August 2, 1862. Crew employed tending gangways and trading. Indians very troublesome and numerous. From appearance expected a disturbance. At 10:30 Indians refused to trade sea-otter skins under a very exorbitant figure. At 11:00 A.M. lit fires and prepared to start. At 1:00 P.M. the chief of the lower village came on board, and all Indian women left the ship. After much discussion and anger, from Sitka Indians especially, they refused to trade and forced the gangway, Captain Swanson and Mr.Compton each being seized by about thirty Indians armed with knives, guns and clubs, and were instantly disarmed, about three hundred savages rushing on deck. By order of the captain, the chief officer placed the men under arms with rifles, revolvers and swords, and succeeded in keeping the Indians aft at the point of the bayonet, but dared not fire as it would be the signal for the instant death of the captain and the trader. Ordered the crew forward and trained two cannon aft loaded with grape and cannister, which enabled us, after much discussion and with great forbearance on the part of the crew, to effect a parley, and both sides agreed to discharge arms in the air, our men on the bridge and the Indians on the quarter deck. On the Indians giving two sea-otter skins and the chiefs expressing their contrition, many of them departed, taking the revolvers of the captain and Mr.Compton and retaining possession of them. To please the natives the captain and Mr.Compton entered the chief's canoe and paddled around the harbor amidst singing, etc. At 10:00 P.M. succeeded in getting rid of all the Indians without violence by allowing the interpreter to go ashore with them for two or three hours". The ship did receive a hint from the Hoonah chief that hostilities might resume the next day, and slipped away at 3 AM the next morning. The whole incident had almost comedic overtones, but it so easily have become a great tragedy.
   $1,250  
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1785) Northumberland Fusilier Pattern 1897 Sword of Lt. Colonel Thomas Michael Scanlon, Twice Winner of the Military Cross and Mentioned in Despatches. 32 1/2" blade etched with flaming bomb, St.George and dragon, cypher of George V, owner's initials "T.M.S.", battle honours from Wilhelmstahl, various Peninsular battles, to Lucknow, Afghanistan, Khartoum and South Africa. Serial # 8258, retailed by "HAWKES & Co / 1 / SAVILE ROW / W". Hilt bears Northumberland bomb & St.George and dragon; ex. condition original shagreen and wire wrapping. Hilt retains all original nickel plate; blade is ex.+ with untouched original polish. Ex.+ condition overall including field service scabbard. Commissioned a 2nd Lt. on 11 Dec., 1914, Scanlon arrived in France June 14, 1916. Wounded on the Somme Sept. 2, 1916, he was awarded the MC for the following action in the London Gazette, Nov. 14, 1916, p.11066 "When his Battalion was being relieved..... (see pics of document). Another account states "....(he) gathered together a party of seven men and beat back the enemy. Although wounded...Five of them were wounded" (see docs). Scanlon was wounded again at Armentieres in Nov, 1916, and placed in reserve for recuperation and training. Promoted to Captain in June, 1918. Received Bar to MC for gallantry in Aug., 1918. London Gazette, p.4222, "For conspicuous gallantry...." (see docs). On Sept. 2, 1918, Scanlon received a third wound and was sent home to recover. His further service is recorded in the documents, as is his service as a Major in France in 1940. He returned to England when France was overrun by the German onslaught, and served in the Home Guard with the rank of Temp. Lt. Col. in 1942. Thomas Michael Scanlon died at age 87 in 1982, to be soon followed by his wife of 62 years. The fine condition of the sword can be explained by the fact that it likely remained with its owner until comparatively recent times, and was carefully maintained. Further, the couple had no children, so it came to the market in lieu of any close family to inherit it.    $1,250    
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1787) Webley R.I.C. Revolver Sold to New South Wales Police. 2 1/2", .450 cal. barrel with small Birmingham proofs, correct german silver foresight. 6-shot cylinder with Birmingham proofs, number "829" matching frame # 70829. Frame marked ".450 / 1761 / WEBLEY'S over manacled hands MP / N.S.W. POLICE" (1761 is the police inventory #; the manacled hands marked only on guns sold to police departments). Right side serial # 70829 and a small Birmingham proof. Top strap "P.WEBLEY & SON / LONDON & BIRMINGHAM". Action ex. tight working order and indexing, bore fine+ to ex., bright with sharp rifling. Grip checkering is fine+, only slight wear, no cracks or repairs, bears "NSW" stamp. Overall retains 50% original blue, balance smooth plum patina, never cleaned.    $1,600  
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1788) Cased Webley .450 R.I.C. Revolver, Webley's No.1, New Model of 1883, Retailed by Cogswell & Harrison. 4 1/2" barrel with Birmingham proofs. 6-shot cylinder 1 1/2" in length, bears Birmingham proofs, serial #995 as well as #5 which also appears on cylinder pin. Frame serial # 995, Birmingham proof, top strap engraved "COGSWELL & HARRISON / 226 STRAND, LONDON". Action and bore like new - mint. Grip like new. 99% original nickel finish, no wear to edges except for a little bit at rear of frame above grip, very minor and scarcely noticeable, one or two tiny areas of very light freckling, not wear. Screw heads like new. No flash wear at chamber/bore forcing cone interface. Overall condition is ex.++ , and many dealers would call it "virtually mint" , which it really is. Ex. all-original case retains both keys, original cleaning rod, pewter oil bottle, and screwdriver stamped "W.EVANS / PALL MALL". Original Cogswell & Harrison trade label, all fine original green baize lining, worn only where contacted by foresight. In "The Webley Story", Dowell illustrates this exact type, also nickel plated, pl.34e. On p.66, he details how these were made to handle .476, .455, and .450 ammunition. He also states that the long cylinder allowed it to be bored to use .45 Long Colt and .44-40 cartridges, though this cylinder's chambers have a well-defined step where they abruptly choke down and will allow only the above named English rounds with their shorter cases to enter. I tried a .45 LC round, it entered for about 2/3 its length and stopped dead at the step. However, it's evident that the cylinder is long enough to handle the American cartridges if properly bored. I mention this only to show Webley's interest in the American market; I most certainly am not suggesting that this revolver be desecrated by boring out the chambers! Note that the lack of Webley's name on the gun is nothing unusual. If requested, especially if by a highly respected firm such as Cogswell & Harrison, Webley would leave name and logo off so the retailer could apply his own. This was a very common custom in the English gun trade. However, in 1889, Webley refused to follow it any more, having learned that some unscrupulous dealers were buying Belgian copies and passing them off as Webleys, and that some had failed their owners. From that date, all Webley production would bear both name and logo. There is no doubt this is a a Webley - its glassy smooth action, precision and obvious quality are unmistakeable. As if Cogswell & Harrison would risk their reputation by trying to pass off a Belgian imposter!     Reduced to $4,250    
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1789) Cased Adams Mk.II Revolver. 4 1/4" octagonal barrel, .450 Boxer cal., marked on top flat "ADAM'S PATENT SMALL ARMS Co, 391, STRAND, LONDON." London view and proof marks. 6-shot cylinder with serial # 2484 (matching frame), London proofs. Frame marked "ADAM'S PATENT No 2484" with Adam's "TRADE MARK". Perfect, like new working order and indexing, chambers and bore mint, bright sharp rifling. Grip like new, shows no wear. Gun in ex.+ condition, retains 95%+ brilliant unworn original blue, just minor dulling / flaking on outside of trigger guard and on short upper grip tang. Case in ex. condition, original tools include screwdriver, brass cleaning rod, round wood box with screw-off lid (for spare screws?), all original green baize lining shows virtually no wear, original large Adam's trade label with instructions for use intact with minor staining from oily gun but entirely legible. Case lid has inset brass medallion engraved with owner's name "EDMUND RANDOLPH Esq. 69th REG't" .     Reduced to $4,250    
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1790) British Musician's Sword of the 2nd (Hussar) Regiment Bucks Yeomanry, dated 1824. 27 1/2" flat side blade etched with maker's address "BICKNELL / & MOORE / OLD BOND STREET / LONDON" (founded in 1755, the firm was at this address 1815-37). Brass mounted mamluke-style hilt with wood grip scales. Sword in VG condition, blade smooth with light staining in places, retains original scabbard washer, all-brass scabbard with several dents that do not detract, engraved "GIVEN BY LT COL THE MARQUIS OF CHANDOS FOR THE USE OF THE YEOMEN COMPOSING THE BAND OF THE 2nd OR HUSSAR REGt BUCKS YEOMANRY 1824". The Royal Buckinghamshire Yeomanry Cavalry consisted of 3 regiments in 1803, but by 1827 only the 2nd regiment was retained, privately funded by the Duke of Buckingham and Chandos. Lt. Col. the Marquis of Chandos was an officer in the regiment (eventually its Colonel), moreover, the first son of the Duke. Upon the death of his father in 1839, he became the 2nd Duke of Buckingham and Chandos. Sword comes with further research.    $675    
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1791) Imperial German Model 1879 Reichsrevolver. 7 1/2", 10.55mm cal, barrel with eagle proof, serial # 5997, Mundungswulst ("fat mouth") muzzle. Frame dated 1881, matching serial # 5997, "S&S VCS CGH SUHL" on sideplate (also #5997), the consortium of Sauer & Sohn, V.Christian Schilling and C.G. Haenel. Cylinder matching #5997 as is cylinder pin - in fact, all numbers are matching, with small parts down to the last screw numbered "97". Action in ex. crisp working order and indexing. Chambers and bore are mint. Fine grips have several small dings, but no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, matching #5997 stamped on both inside. All metal edges are sharp, all markings deep and clear. Overall condition is Fine+, retains a smooth blue-black original finish. Grip buttplate bears canceled unit markings "58.A.E.2." and second unit markings "1.M.58.78.". A fine, untouched example.    $1,600    
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1792) Royal Navy Sea Service Pistol dated 1805. 9", .57 cal. barrel with Government proofs, crown / GR / Broad Arrow, etc. Inspectors' stamps near touch hole and barrel tang. Lock in ex. crisp working order, marked with Crown over "GR" and "TOWER" plus lock inspector's stamp. Fine stock never refinished, with storekeeper's stamp dated 1805, inspectors' stamps beside trigger guard tang, original belthook stamped with crown, as is the original ramrod. This is not a shortened Sea Service Long pistol (although some of these were indeed shortened), the angle of the grip is more pronounced, the sideplate and belthook are different; it is entirely purpose-built. Note that it retains, however, the plain buttcap of the Sea Service pattern, as well, of course, the SS caliber. See R. Brooker "British Military Pistols 1603-1888", fig. 56, p.63. and p.66 for text. Brooker's example is identical in every repect, also dated 1805. The author comments that "..these pistols are somewhat scarce..." , probably because there were so many SS Long pistols available to be shortened. Smooth clean metal overall, all markings deep and clear, though the stock's storekeeper's stamp is partly worn, the 1805 date is unmistakable. Completely original in all respects.    $2,500    
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1799) Danish Model 1789 "Rytterpallask" Heavy Cavalry Sword. 36 3/4" blade with broad central fuller, narrow fuller along back, small punch-mark at forte; VG+ condition, smooth dark age patina with small areas of light pitting. Heavy, large guard of brass with nice age patina, thumb ring and large globular pommel, all original leather grip covering with twisted brass wire wrap in fine condition. Left inside guard with punch-dot unit marking "9.5."   $1,450  
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1800) Royal Navy Pattern 1804 Cutlass. 29" flat blade with inspector's stamp crown over 8, maker "BATE" (known contractor) and large "Crown over GR". Blade is smooth with scattered pitting. Figure-8 iron guard is solid, and in fine condition. Partial strikes of the large Crown over GR are very common on these cutlass blade - it's not worn or over-cleaned, this is how it looked when new. The flat blades are wedge shaped in cross section, and unless the die was held at the proper angle when struck, the result was as you see here - deep on one side, faint on the other. I've more than once seen the marking double-struck to correct the deficiency of the first hit but usually creating a blurry double image. It's obvious the inspectors couldn't care less. A once common cutlass getting harder to find.    $1,200    
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1802) A Unique Pennsylvania Double-Barrel Pistol by George Schalk, Pottsville. 4 7/8" , .60 cal. heavy smoothbore barrels die stamped "G.SCHALK" on one, "POTTSVILLE" on the other. Brass bead foresight, frame mounted V rearsight. Engraved brass frame and trigger guard; original wood grips in fine condition, not refinished, no cracks or repairs. Engraving is of professional quality, incorporating floral scrolls and fanciful animals. Ex. working order, powerful mainsprings, half and full cocks function perfectly. Nipples are not battered down. Barrels are a smooth brown patina with good bores. A solid and substantial arm, heavier than you expect and very well made, with appealing and unusual lines. George Schalk (1825-1893) was born in Wiesbaden, Germany. Under apprenticeship he learned the trades of locksmith and gunsmith. Passing his guild examination in 1850, aged 25, Schalk received his credentials as a master of both trades in 1852. He emigrated to Pottsville in 1854 and set up in business, his card listing his specialties as "Gain Twist Rifles, Common Rifles, Pigeon Guns, Double Shotguns, Common Guns, Pistols, etc". Closest to Schalk's heart was his development of extremely accurate rifling systems and bullets. He was a Master shot, winning many cups and gold medals in Schuetzen and other rifle matches. A young Harry M. Pope first encountered George Schalk at a match in Newark, NJ, and in later years remembered that while he said little, he listened "...to wisdom...saying little but drinking in all I could without intruding". When he had established himself as America's finest barrel maker, Pope acknowledged that were it not for George Schalk's influence, he might well have remained a bicycle maker. In his early advertising, Pope stated that he could provide "barrels on the Schalk System". It is probable that Schalk and then Pope were the most prominent men in the field of single shot rifles in America. Although Schalk listed pistols in his advertising, he seems to have made very few of them. When Henry A. Truslow wrote his article on Schalk in 1988 (copy to buyer), he had located only two. One was a miniature for a watch fob, the other a unique capping breech loader stamped in two lines "G.SCHALK / POTTSVILLE". The die stamps used on this double barrel pistol I offer here appear identical to those stamped on one of his Schuetzen rifles, the markings illustrated on line, same style, font, etc. Pistol is in VG+, all original condition with no restoration. The wood ramrod may not be the original, though perhaps it is, since the age patterns on its surface as determined by the pistol's fittings show it has been in it for a long time.    $3,800    
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1805) British Mk.II Enfield Revolver. 5 3/4" barrel, .476 cal., serial # 4058, small proof on topstrap. 6-shot cylinder matching # 4058, same inspector's stamp on each chamber as on barrel. Frame matching # 4058; marked with Crown over "VR / ENFIELD / 1882 / II", crown inspector's stamp. Barrel / frame lockup is like new; action is in perfect, like-new working order and indexing. Ex. grip retains much original varnish, only several small dings, no cracks or repairs. Gun retains much original blue finish, gently fading to smooth plum on cylinder and part of barrel. All markings deep and clear as new. Bore and chambers are mint. All screwheads are perfect. A fine example of an extremely well-made (like the Merwin-Hulbert, it had to be if it was going to work at all) but unsuccessful design.    $2,000    
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1809) Canadian Issue Colt London Navy Revolver. 7 1/2", .36 cal. barrel with London proofs, marked "ADDRESS. COL. COLT. LONDON." Frame marked "COLT'S PATENT". Cylinder retains ex. full scene, including tiny edge marking "ENGAGED 16 MAY 1843" , and the equally tiny and shallow Ormsby signature (thinning but there) under "COLT'S PATENT No. 33236", London proofs, ex. nipples, cylinder pins show some wear but still function as designed to lock up the cylinder. Ex. grips retain 95%+ original varnish, sharp edges show almost no wear; no cracks, chips or repair; stamped "UC / G / 17" , and with a deep clear crown inspector's stamp on right grip near frame (the position where all 800 of the purchase were stamped). All serial numbers matching # 33236 - barrel, wedge ("236"), frame, trigger guard, backstrap, loading lever, and cylinder. Barrel retains 45% original bright blue, balance thinning but will still reflect the original high polish - never touched up or cleaned in any way - the lower 3 flats especially retain most original blue. Loading lever, hammer, and frame retain much original case color. Traces of original blue on t.g. and backstrap. All metal edges are sharp and crisp. All screw heads are perfect, unbuggered; it is likely the gun was never apart. Action, indexing, work fine, though I suspect the tip of the trigger sear is chipped slightly so as to shorten it a bit since the hammer rests a little further forward than usual in the loading notch and full cock. However, the action still performs all its functions properly. No. 33236 was issued to the Napanee ("G") Troop of Upper Canada. Its serial number lies between #'s 33233 and 33237 as recorded in a 1989 article in the Journal of Arms Collecting, Vol.27, No.1, listing known surviving Canadian Navy Colts. The list made no pretence to be complete - indeed I have over the years owned 5 other UC or LC Colts not on the list, along with some that were. The holster is a genuine 1856 purchase item, stamped where it should be with the Napanee issue markings "UC / G / 19" (close, but no cigar!) inside the flap with the same dies as used on the pistol grips. It is in generally good condition, missing the leather plug at the muzzle. The original strap and brass stud closure (you can see the stitching pattern) has been replaced during its working life by a small buckle (missing) and leather tongue. The original sewn-on belt loop (its stitched pattern also still visible) was replaced with a riveted leather and brass loop. These Colts and their accoutrements were in service for a long time; when the 1885 Rebellion broke out, they were still the principal revolver available. A large order for Colt 1878 revolvers was hastily placed! A completely correct and honest untouched revolver.      Reduced to $6,250    
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1810) U.S. Model 1861 Rifle-Musket. 40", .58 cal. barrel marked with "V", "P" and eaglehead, dated 1862. Bore is in ex.+ condition, bright with sharp rifling. Lock markings "US / NORWICH", Eagle, date "1863". Note that a one year difference between lock and barrel dates is a frequent occurrence on both private contractor and Springfield Arsenal guns and is considered of no consequence when the condition of components matches (as they do here).Lock is in ex. working order, hammer nose is slightly chipped. Solid stock, no cracks or repairs, just a very few minor dings, has been cleaned and refinished, though in an attractive manner. Two inspectors' cartouches are still visible though faint, plus the large oval cartouche of James D.Mowry, a major partner in the Norwich firm. With its ex.+ to near mint bore, this would make a fine shooter. All metal is clean, no pitting, deep clear markings. Original rammer and sling swivels.     Reduced to $950  
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1813) British Royal Navy William IV Sea Service Pistol. 9", .65 cal barrel bears Georgian proofs of Crown/GR/Broad Arrow and Crown over crossed sceptres, barrel inspector's stamp near vent, Crown stamp near tang. New Land pattern swivel rammer. The Georgian proofs show this barrel was taken from new old stock never previously mounted (a common feature of these WR pistols), and given the blackening treatment so characteristic of these William IV Sea Service pistols, of which it retains 95% in fine condition. Lock with Crown over "WR", stamped with lock inspectors stamp of Crown over Broad Arrow, crisp, like new working order. Ex.+ stock with no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, sharp edges, various crown inspectors' stamps, large Broad Arrow over "BO" (Board of Ordnance). A really excellent condition pistol, complete and entirely original.    $2,000    
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1814) Sword of Lt.Col. C.M.Porteous, 9th Gurkha Rifles, 1914. 32 3/4" blade etched with scrolls, Crown over "VR", Wilkinson address, owner's initial "CMP" (Charles McLeod Porteous) ,serial # 27194 (made 1886). Blade professionally edged for combat. Pattern 1827 Rifle Regiment officer's guard; grip retains all original shagreen except for small piece missing on reverse side, original wire wrap. Nickel plated scabbard in good condition except for some rust on drag. It fits the sword well enough although a bit tight; however, a four year old child could draw and sheath it. The copy of the Wilkinson ledger (goes to buyer) for # 27194 records that it was an 1822 Infantry Officers sword sold in 1886 to "C.Porteous Esq., 4th Royal Fusiliers". Knowing little of Porteous' career, such as when he left the 4th Regiment, and for what branch or other regiment, I can only say that at the least, he would certainly have had the brass 1822 hilt replaced by the rifle regiment hilt when he became Lt.Col. of the 9th Gurkha Rifles, later Colonel of the Second Battalion 1914. It was a very common practice for officers who changed their branch of service, or when new regulations stipulated a revised hilt, to simply have the old blade re-hilted. Porteous ended his military career as a Brig. General in 1919. He was the father of Col. Patrick Anthony Porteous, 4 commando, who earned the VC fighting alongside the Canadians at Dieppe in 1942.    $750    
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1818) British Second Pattern Brunswick Rifle Bayonet. 22 1/4" blade marked "ENFIELD" with inspector's stamp. Brass hilt with issue markings "1 Co / 43" . Retains original leather throat washer. Blade in fine condition, patches of very light surface pitting/staining, much original polish remains. Far better than average overall condition.    $325    
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1819) British Socket Bayonet for P-39 Musket. 17 1/4" blade marked: "S.HILL", "X", Crown inspector's stamp, several other small stamps. 3" socket with smooth original brown patina; blade fine condition, clean and smooth.    $175    
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1820) Hagner #2 45-70 Leather Cartridge Pouch. Cover flap embossed "US" ; marked "No.2" on back; closing tab has tiny inspector's initials on tip. Pouch contains 3 rows of canvas loops, 8 loops to a row. All seam stitching and canvas loops are sound and intact, fine condition. Leather is fine also. This pouch design developed by Col.P.V.Hagner, Commanding Officer of Watervliet Arsenal.    $175  
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1821) Montenegrin Revolver c.1885-90. 3 3/4" barrel with integral foresight, marked "VERO MONTENEGRINO". 5-shot cylinder stamped #52, matching #52 on frame. Belgian proof for rifled arms. Chambered for the large (by handgun standards) Austrian Werndl Cavalry Carbine round, as was the original Gasser Montenegrin revolver of 1870, also issued to the Austrian military. Ex. crisp working and indexing order, double or single action. Lightly engraved overall; retains 90% original nickel plate. Hammer, trigger, and ejector mechanism retain good traces of original blue. Grips retain fine checkering, no chips, cracks or repairs. Bore has strong rifling, dark in the grooves.    $700  
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1822) Colt 1851 Navy Revolver, Made Late 1861. 7 1/2" oct. barrel marked "ADDRESS COL. SAML COLT NEW-YORK U.S. AMERICA". Correct brass bead foresight. Frame marked "COLT'S / PATENT". Cylinder scene worn, but some 20% remains, clear "COLT'S PATENT No 117028". Action fine working order. All numbers matching - barrel, lever, wedge, cylinder arbor, cylinder, frame, backstrap and trigger guard. Nipples are not battered down. Bore is dark but with strong rifling. Grips are fine, little wear to edges, never cleaned, no cracks or repairs, only a few minor dings. Gun has smooth, crisp-edged metal overall, never cleaned or buffed down, light age patina. An honest Colt, made at the start of the Civil War.   $1,650    
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1823) Caucasian/Russian Cossack Kindjal, circa mid to late 19th century. Heavy, 13" flattened diamond section blade with characteristic offset fullers. Dark horn grip with silver niello domed rivets, small old repaired crack at pommel on back - nothing replaced, just re-secured. Wood scabbard retains original leather covering in fine condition, fine silver niello mounts. Fine condition overall, blade with smooth, clean surface.   $750  
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1824) British Brunswick Rifle for Indian Service. 30", .70 cal barrel rifled with 2 deep grooves, folding leaf backsight and bayonet bar of standard 2nd Model design. Pattern '53 lock marked with "Crown VR", "TOWER / 1864" and inspector's stamp of Broad Arrow over "I" (India). This Brunswick pattern was sealed 30th July, 1864. Solid stock, no cracks or repairs, marked with WO (War Office) rondel enclosing Crown and Broad Arrow over "1" (First Class Arm), along with large Broad Arrow over "I". In all respects save one, this Brunswick is identical to the Second Model made for the Royal Rifle Brigade before the introduction of the P-51 / P-53 series. The only difference is the provision of the more modern P-53 lock, which, on this gun, is in ex. crisp working order. Barrel retains a smooth surface, and considerable original blue turning plum. Bore is dark with deep clear rifling. The quality of manufacture is in no way inferior to that found on British Rifle Brigade Brunswicks. The rational behind the re-introduction of the Brunswick Pattern is interesting. Following the 1857 Mutiny, it was decided that no rifled arms would be issued to ordinary Indian infantry. However, it was considered desirable that the Sikhs be equipped with a more accurate arm than a smoothbore, but not so accurate as the P-51 / P-53 rifles issued to British Regulars. This, the third and last incarnation of the Brunswick infantry rifle, was the answer. See C.H.Roads, "The British Soldier's Firearm, 1850-1864", p.110.    $2,300    
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1825) Caucasian / Russian Cossack Shashka, circa 1850-75. 30" multi-fullered blade of distinctive shashka form, probably of Solingen origin. I have seen this exact pattern of etching once before on a shashka blade ,attributed to Solingen
Generally speaking, Caucasian warriors preferred blades from Europe; Persian "poulad jauharder" damascus (Russian: "bulat") was considered too brittle. Solingen wisely paid very close attention to their agents and merchants from areas all over the world, and produced blades of quality in configurations calculated to appeal to local markets. Hilt and scabbard mounts of matching relief carved silver niello, with gold wash highlights. Scabbard of wood, leather covered in traditional ass skin, seam stitching intact, some small surface scratches but in fine condition with no repairs. Blade has some small areas of light pitting, shows age and wear but has been maintained over the years - no edge nicks and very sharp. A good shashka, with fine quality hilt and scabbard mounts.
   $3,800  
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1829) British Light Cavalry Officer's Sword of Captain John W.Burns. 35" Wilkinson blade #26989 (made 1891) with full battle honours from Dettingen to Goojerat, Crown over crest of "3rd KING'S OWN HUSSARS". Below this appears the heraldic crest of the Burns family. Reverse with "VR" under Crown, and Wilkinson address. Scabbard in VG condition with several dents down by the drag. Hilt and scabbard smooth and clean. Grip retains all fine original shagreen and silver wire wrap. Blade is like new, mint, crisp deep etching entirely like new. Copy of Wilkinson ledger entry for # 26989 reads "Proved Nov 23 1881 / Length 35" / Med / Lt Cavalry / Sold to J.W.S. Burns Esq. / Regiment: 3rd Hussars" . Copy goes to purchaser.
Although sold with the 3-bar guard used by Light Cavalry officers since 1821, the sword was remounted in accordance with the regulation of 1886 that henceforward all cavalry officers, Light or Heavy, would use the more protective Heavy Cavalry hilt. Most Light Cavalry officers who had purchased their swords before the 1886 regulation sent them back to the maker or retailer for re-hilting, though some miscreants flouted the regulation and kept unchanged the sword they had entered the service with. Burns apparently sent his back to Wilkinsons, where it was fitted with its new hilt in a perfectly professional manner.
From the London Gazette, May 7, 1895, we learn that "Captain John W.Burns, from 3rd Hussars" was transferred to the 1st Dragoons. This regiment served in the Second Boer War with the battle honours "Relief of Ladysmith" and "South Africa 1899-1902". Captain Burns retired from the 1st Dragoons in June 22, 1901, and by that time most of the fighting was over with the relief of all besieged British garrisons and the capture of the Boer capitol, Pretoria, on 5 June, 1900, though the war straggled on with dogged Boer guerilla tactics until May, 1902.
   $850    
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1831) A Good Kulah-Khud, 18th-19th Century. Skull and nasal incised and chiseled with gilt raised decorative floral elements and Arabic script. Camail of ring-butted mail, complete with no losses or damage. Like virtually all kulah-khuds, the spike unscrews. Small remnants of the red velvet liner remain inside the skull. Completely original, no restoration or repair, and doesn't need any. Gilding just very slightly worn, but remains 95% plus intact, as you can see.    $2,200    
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1832) British Issue Second Model (post 1809) India Pattern Musket. 39", .75 cal barrel stamped with Government proofs "Crown / GR / Broad Arrow" and "Crown over crossed sceptres" ; inspector's stamp of Crown on end of tang. Lock marked "TOWER", Crown over GR" and bears lock inspector's stamp of crown over Broad Arrow under pan. Original topjaw and screw. Ex. working order with powerful main and frizzen springs. Metal overall bears a deep but smooth untouched age patina. Solid uncleaned stock, minor chip out behind lock, no cracks or repairs, deep "mustard" patina on all brass mounts, original sling swivels. Ramrod is a working era replacement with handforged button, patina matches gun. Counter-lock area bears contractor's initials "WD" (cannot be War Department, since this was not formed until 1855). A good British military musket that could have been at Waterloo.    $2,500    
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1841) Belgian Pinfire Pepperbox c. 1855-60. 1 7/8", six-shot barrel cluster with Liege proofs, 7mm smooth clean bores. Folding double-action only trigger, hinged loading gate. Ex. like new working order. Carved and checkered wood grips, ex. condition, no cracks or repairs. Ejector rod unscrews from bottom of grip frame. Barrel group and frame engraved with floral design, retain 95% original fine blue. Frame stamped "DERREZ / Cte". An excellent condition example in all respects.    $675    
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1842) A Fine English Hanger c. 1690. 19 1/2" blade with 5" false edge. Brass hilt with raised, chased, engraved and pierced decoration of far better than average quality. Original stag horn grip in ex. condition, untouched tang button. Fine condition overall, blade is smooth and clean. No damage, repairs or restoration of any sort to the sword. This type of hanger was very popular with naval officers of the era, and is often seen in their portraits.   $875    
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1843) French Double-barrel All Steel Pistol c.1770-80. 1 1/4" , .32 cal. cannon-muzzle barrels, apparently rifled down to chambers in frame, length from touch-holes to muzzles 2 1/2". Overall length of pistol 6". Box-lock actions, frizzen springs concealed in upper flats of chambers. Ex. working order, both cocks hold firmly at full and half cock, trigger guard moves forward at half cock to lock cocks and triggers on safe. Lightly floral engraved overall with smooth clean metal. No proofmarks. According to "Les Armes a Feu" by Marcel Baldet, p.105, these all-steel pistols were known as "a l'Ecossaise" (in the Scottish style). Baldet illustrates one identical to this example, and dates it to the end of the reign of Louis XV (1774). VG+ to fine condition overall.

Note: First introduced c. 1700, barrel proofing in France was an on-again, off-again affair; sometimes enforced and sometimes abolished, much resisted by civilian gunmakers and often ignored by them until Napoleon locked it in under strict specifications in 1810.
   $975    
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1844) French Pocket Pistol by Dally, Paris. 2", .50 cal turn-off barrel. Like #1843, there are no proof marks. Obverse frame engraved with fox, reverse with lion (cunning combined with strength), under side signed "DALLY / a Paris". Barrel and frame numbered "2". Folding trigger well concealed by same high quality engraving seen on sides. Thumb safety. Ex. working order. Converted from flint with a nicely contoured hammer. Silver studded checkered wood grip in fine condition with silver rondels. Nicolas Dally (working 1762-81 in Paris)) is the only Dally listed in Stockel except for another in Ohio 1852-88. Both in style and quality this pistol compares favourably with some of the less elaborate pocket pistols produced by Nicolas Noel Boutet (1761-1833). See pair of Boutet pocket pistols on cover of Cowans Auctions catalog, May 3-4, 2017, lot 57. The resemblance is obvious.    $675    
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1845) English Harquebusier's Armour of the Civil Wars Era, c. 1640-50. Helmet of a distinctively English type with 3-bar face guard fitted to hinged peak, 2-piece skull and 1-piece neck guard with simulated lames. Typical heavy weight breastplate with proofing dent and indistinct armourer's stamp at throat. Backplate of usual lighter construction. The armoured shoulder straps are accurate replacements, as indeed is probably all the leather except for that around the inner edges of the original cheek-pieces on the helmet, and such replacement is true of over 99% of these armours. When David Blackmore wrote "Arms and Armour of the English Civil Wars", apparently none of the harquebusier's armours in the Royal Armouries (Tower of London and the new Royal Armouries in Leeds) had their original shoulder straps either. However, in the loan collection from the armoury of Littlecote House, one such armour was found that did retain its original straps (Blackmore is in charge of the loan collections in the Royal Armouries). Some of the leather restorations I've seen over the years probably dated from Victorian times, based on the fragmentary remains still on the armours, and the leather on these restorations is starting to look pretty aged. A good and genuine armour from Cromwellian times.
   $5,200  
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1846) Rare French Grenadier's Hanger c. 1750. 28" single edged curved blade with narrow 28" fuller along back edge, vg+ condition with light age patina. Brass hilt of "pontat simple" (Fr.) or single-shell type (curved blades for Grenadiers, straight for Infantry Fusiliers, introduced c. 1720). A tiny poincon is stamped in the reverse knucklebow. Tang button is undisturbed, entire hilt bears a pleasing mustard age patina. Original grip wrap consisting of thicker twisted brass wire combined with thinner twisted brass wire. This is the correct pattern, as borne out by several illustrations in the newly published (2016) "French Military Arms and Armor in America", author Rene Chartrand, published by Mowbray/Man-at-Arms, and which I highly recommend. See the back cover for a color illustration of the identical hilt, with a straight single edged blade for regular infantry. It is the same pattern as in this Grenadier's sword if its blade were straightened out. In 1756, the pontat simple was officially superceded by a virtually identical hilt except for the addition of an inboard shell, though how soon this new pattern became widely available, especially to troops in America is open to question. The French government was notoriously penurious and slow with equipping its North American forces. Chartrand categorically states the pontat simple was used in America, and provides examples. Although the blades of excavated examples are usually rusted into fragments, the brass hilts are found here and there at French military sites and forts from Louisburg through Quebec to Lake Superior, from there down the Mississippi to New Orleans, and as far west as Kansas to Fort Duquesn in Pittsburg. Perhaps it is significant that this sword was found by a picker in a house in Pittsburg.
Condition overall is VG+, complete, untouched with no restoration or damage, entirely original. This Grenadier's hanger is very much a French and Indian Wars sword.
   $1,400    
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1847) Fine English Blunderbuss by Durs Egg, c.1775-85, property of General Thomas Graham, Laird of Balgowan, later Lord Lynedoch. 15 1/2" brass barrel, 1 1/4" bore at muzzle, narrowing down to approx. .75 - .80 cal., octagonal at breech, London view and proof marks, engraved "D. EGG - LONDON" , fitted with 14" spring bayonet. When I obtained this blunderbuss the bayonet was inclined not to lock in deployed position, but all it needed was some oil on the catch: it now works exactly as Egg intended it should. Lock engraved "D. EGG", fitted with bolted safety and roller frizzen spring, of highest quality (extremely crisp and smooth) and in like-new working order. Bolted safeties date from the mid-18th century or earlier, and a dueling pistol by Egg dated to 1775-80 has a roller frizzen spring ( Clay P. Bedford "Early Firearms of Great Britain and Ireland from the Collection of Clay P.Bedford" Metropolitan Museum of Art, # 74, p.81-84). Original top-jaw and screw, and most likely the last flint put in it during its working life. Solid stock, crisp checkered wrist, small repair obverse muzzle, short crack at reverse muzzle (see pics). All-brass furniture engraved with martial motifs. Rammer is original, last 1 -2" broken off, but this slight damage is, of course, invisible when rammer is in stock. Overall condition is Fine +. Durs Egg was one of the most celebrated gunsmiths of London in the later 18th and early 19th centuries. Born in Switzerland in 1745, trained there and apparently in France, he came to London in 1772. He obtained the Royal Warrant of the Prince Regent, later George IV. The oval brass sideplate cum lockscrew washer is engraved with the motto of the Grahams of Balgowan "CANDIDE ET SECURE", as well as their hawk and below that Thomas Graham's initials "T.G.". See pic from heraldry website and compare with sideplate engraving; they are identical. The motto could be translated as "straightforward and trustworthy". And this Thomas Graham of Balgowan proved to be, though justifiably a motto "relentless and vengeful" might have served just as well, as we will see.

Graham did not initially choose a military career. Inheriting the estates of Balgowan, in Perthshire, Scotland, the new Laird set about employing and teaching the most progressive agricultural and animal husbandry methods, benefiting both his own returns and those of his tenants. His reputation became that of a successful and fair landlord. He stood for election, and became the Member of Parliament for Perthshire. It is known that he was inclined to view the events of 1789 Revolutionary France with cautious understanding. As an MP, he was obliged to maintain a fine residence in London, and this is where his wife, Mary Cathcart, daughter of Lord Cathcart, (sister of the Duchess of Atholl and the Countess of Mansfield, both married to Murrays), and much beloved by her husband, enters the picture for our purposes.

Lady Graham soon became one of the leading beauties (in fact, probably the reigning one) of London society in the later 1780's. Gainsborough, the preeminent portraitist of his era, portrayed her in the famous "The Beautiful Mrs. Graham", a painting which survives to this day, and which leaves no doubt as to her striking and elegant appearance (see pic). On one occasion during Graham's time in London, he was stopped by three footpads on his way to a court function (a party, by other accounts) in his coach while accompanied by his wife and another noblewoman. Two of the thieves held the horses whilst the third attempted to rob the occupants of the coach. Graham drew his smallsword, leapt across the ladies and flung the miscreant to the pavement with the sword at his throat. This ended the encounter when the other two let loose the horses upon the threat to their accomplice. It seems likely that Graham did not have access to a firearm, and it may have been this event that occasioned his purchase of the blunderbuss, which is of a size best described as "coaching" rather than the smaller home defense type. On a more serious note, and at some time after this event ( but obviously not connected), Mrs. Graham fell prey to a serious respiratory illness (probably tuberculosis), and her doctor advised her husband to take her to a southern Mediterranean climate. He immediately did so, but sadly she died off the south coast of France in 1792, while aboard ship. Graham was taking her home overland when Revolutionary French officials (troops, in other accounts), insisted in breaking open and searching her coffin. It was a sacrilegious violation that completely altered the Laird of Balgowan's life. Enraged with an implacable hatred of the French, he returned to Scotland, buried his wife, and raised at his own expense the 90th Foot ("The Perthshire Grey Breeks"), which he took to Portugal as its Colonel. Evidencing considerable military talent, Graham was unable to obtain deserved promotion by the Duke of York's regulations. Nevertheless, at the dying wish of Sir John Moore, he was raised to the rank of Major General.

General Graham returned with Wellington to the Peninsula; his career there is recorded in many histories. I will cite one event, the Battle of Barossa, 5 March 1811, to give an example of the service he was capable of rendering. Sent with 5200 British and Portuguese troops to assist the Spanish in raising the French siege of Cadiz, General Graham agreed to participate in a Spanish attempt to attack the besieging French from the rear. The Spanish contributed 9600 troops under General La Pena, who received overall command of the venture because he command the majority. It was not an ill-conceived plan, but everything depended upon a swift circling movement before the French could prepare an adequate response and La Pena wasn't up to it. The advance of the combined force was slow, hesitant, and the French mustered 7000 troops under Marshal Victor to move out and defeat the allies. Learning of the French approach, Graham decided to hold his 5200 men in an advantageous position on Barossa Ridge to receive them, but La Pena ordered him to march on. Graham obeyed, but wisely left a battalion and some cavalry under Major Brown to hold the ridge. Unlike La Pena, Marshal Victor also saw the importance of the ridge, and attacked with two divisions which forced Brown to retreat and warn Graham, who promptly turned about and retook the ridge, beating off two French downhill counterattacks in the process. Victor now sent four French columns under Laval. At a range of fifty yards, British and Portuguese volleys from a line two deep forced the French to retreat, with the cavalry of the Kings German Legion finishing the business. The day was won - but incredibly without help of any sort from the Spanish who simply looked on (in fairness, there were Spanish officers who saw the wonderful opportunity to use their numerous cavalry to attack the retreating French and begged to do so - but La Pena refused). The siege of Cadiz was not lifted. It was at Barossa that the first French Eagle to be taken in battle by the British was captured by Sergeant Patrick Masterson of the 89th Foot, whose regimental slogan was "Faught a Ballagh" ( Gaelic: "Clear the Way"). For this, Masterson received a lieutenancy and the 89th the title "The Prince of Wales Own Irish Regiment", plus the right to place an eagle on their colours. Disgusted, Graham refused the Spanish offer of Grandee of the First Class, and returned to the main army in Portugal. He subsequently became Wellington's second in command. It remains an unanswerable question whether General Graham kept his blunderbuss in his coach on campaign. Certainly all such senior officers had a coach - a place for maps, correspondence, orders and copies of orders sent, spare and full dress uniforms, etc.,and small arms. At the very least, they would have a pair of pistols for the saddle holsters of the horse they rode in battle, and many were known to keep entire garnitures of firearms. It wasn't only Royal Mail coaches that were armed with blunderbusses, indeed in 18th and early 19th century England, the words "coach" and "blunderbuss" naturally go together. And did Graham remember his own coaching encounter of years gone by?
   $7,500  
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1848) French Year 9 (An IX) Light Infantry Musket. 40 1/2", .69 cal. barrel marked "MD" at breech, "M an 9" on breech tang. Year 9 was the ninth year of the Revolution, starting in August, 1800. The lock is of the Year 9 type with angled brass pan, marked "C.F. / Mre de MUTZIG". It is in crisp, like-new working order, has original topjaw and screw. Regulation iron mounted solid stock, never cleaned, no cracks or repairs, stamped with various inspectors' marks, a large French rooster (Coq) under "COULOUX FRERES" with "MUTZIG" below is stamped on obverse butt, reverse stamped with "PDL" in circle. Original ramrod and sling swivels. Couloux Freres (the "C.F." on lock) were powerful entrepreneurs in French arms manufacturing. In 1797 they took over the arms manufactory in Mutzig as private entrepreneurs controlling a government arsenal. A fine, all-original musket with smooth clean metal overall.    $1,800    
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1849) A Good 17th Century Indian Katar with "Zirah-bhonk" (mail-piercer) Blade. Overall length 18 1/2", blade length 9 1/2". Blade is very finely forged, with extremely precise fullers and configuration. The lower 4 1/2" swells to a thickness of 1/2", tapering down to a needle-like point designed to defeat mail armour. Blade is smooth with a light patina. Iron grip retains about 40% gold koftgari, the balance a deep but smooth age patina. A good and early example of a uniquely Indian weapon.    $475    
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1851) Bavarian Model 1806 Infantry Sword. 23 1/4" blade etched with crown over cypher of King Maximilian Ist on both sides. Blade is clean and smooth with a little minor pitting near tip; all markings are very clear. Brass hilt bears deep mustard patina; is in fine complete and undamaged condition. See pics for identification: "429 Infanterie sabel, Bayern, M. 1806". After the Ulm-Austerlitz campaign, Napoleon consolidated his hold over the western German lands through the creation of the Confederation of the Rhine in 1806. Together with 15 other German states, Bavaria agreed to accept the "protection" of France and provide 63,000 troops to be commanded by French officers. Bavarian troops accompanied Napoleon to Russia in 1812, fought at Borodino, entered Moscow, and suffered greatly in the horrendous retreat. The Confederation fell apart after Napoleon's defeat at Leipzig in 1813.   $475    
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1854) Spanish Bilbo Hilted Cavalry Broadsword c.1750. 33 1/2 blade of flattened lenticular section, engraved/etched for 11" at forte with well-executed leaf and vine design; 10" fullers both sides with letters "HACOM" , possibly the bladesmith's name or the initials of an invocation. Bi-lobe hilt secured in the traditional style by 4 screws. It is a no-nonsense functional guard, but there is nothing crude about it - it is graceful and practical without needing embelishment. The original grip is of wood with the usual four iron straps. Note that it was apparently never wire wrapped as it is next to impossible to press tightly wound twisted wire down with these four straps, and yet leave no impression in the grip's surface. Fine condition overall, no repairs, damage or restoration. This is the sword of a cavalry officer, or perhaps a gentleman of militia in New Spain, Mexico, California, etc.   $2,500  
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1856) British Pattern 1889 Staff-Sergeant's Sword. Straight blade 32 3/4", single edge, flat back blade with 21 1/4" fuller, double-edged for last 9" to point. Iron hilt of 1822 Infantry pattern, oval cartouche with crown over "VR", shagreen covered grip with copper wire wrap. Steel scabbard of lighter gauge metal than the similar cavalry trooper's sword of that era. In fact, the first version of this pattern had its scabbard quickly replaced by a lighter one in 1892, which was itself replaced by a still lighter one later that same year. Overall condition is ex.; blade retains all original bright polish; hilt is ex. with some smooth patina on backstrap from handling; scabbard ex. also with no dents whatever. The curious feature of this sword is the complete absence of any markings - no inspectors' stamps, maker's name, dates, etc - except for a tiny number "10" on the back of the scabbard's mouthpiece. The excellent condition of the sword precludes any notion that such markings were ground off. Is it perhaps a developmental example, made to be examined, considered, and then stored away? Staff-Sergeants did not buy their swords like officers did; they were issued Crown inspected and marked weapons. For what it's worth, the seller mentioned he obtained it from Australia years ago.    $550    
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1857) U.S. Model 1833 Dragoon Trooper's Saber. 34" pipe-back blade etched obverse "N.P. AMES / CUTLER / SPRINGFIELD / 1837", on reverse "UNITED STATES", stamped with inspector's initials "WS" at forte (inspector William Smith, who inspected M1833 sabers dated 1837-38). Blade is ex.+, retaining nearly all its original bright polish with markings as clear as the day they were etched. Brass guard in ex. condition, grip retains all original leather covering and twisted brass wire wrap. Quillon stamped "WS". Pommel slotted nut is clearly undisturbed.
There is no bending, distortion or breaking of the guard's branches - more about this and the grip leather below. Scabbard has smooth light age patina overall, only 3 or 4 very minor dings, drag stamped "WS". Overall, an unusually fine example of a sword made in limited numbers, just 6,100 made for enlisted men (regulars and militia). Ames was the only maker of the 1833 Dragoon saber.
The 1833 saber was not a success. It had a heavy and powerful blade, perhaps somewhat point heavy, but the lightweight and fragile brass hilt wasn't up to its task. Many are found today with bent or broken guard branches. The grip leather was either poorly tanned or too thin (maybe both), and many of these swords are found today with their grip leather in ruins, wire missing, or both now modern replacements. Moreover, the scabbard metal proved to be too light, and easily dented. I mention these drawbacks not to make a futile critique of an antique arm, but to explain why so few of an already small production are found in fine unrestored condition today. Within just seven years all of the above flaws were addressed by the introduction of the Model 1840 sword, the old "Wristbreaker".
   $2,200  
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1858) A Quality Pair of Gambler's or Dandy's Pistols c.1840. 3 3/4", .45 cal. turn-off barrels of genuine damascus. Engraved frames with folding triggers, Liege proofs, actions in perfect crisp working order. Like new carved ebony grips, with hinged cap boxes in buttcaps. Both pistols in mint condition, bores smooth though showing signs of being fired. The quality of their manufacture is evident. The belt is of leather-backed brocade with a leaf and vine motif, to match the extraordinarily colorful clothing worn by young men of fashion in this era, as well as by men of less than sterling repute. The holsters are professionally made; one has the lower end of its belt strap with a modern repair which could easily be improved upon (see pic); the strap of the other is intact. The belt is in good complete condition, most wear in two places where the holster belt straps have caused fraying. Such outfits are very rare, with a great power to evoke an era. You can almost hear the river boat's paddles chunking up the Mississippi. The case is certainly of the period and in fine condition. The deep impressions made by the belt and holstered pistols are obvious, as is also the their outline in the color of the liner, and the discoloration caused by oxidation of the lead bullets.    $4,000    
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1859) Spanish Miquelet Pistol with "Catalan" Style Stock c. 1750-80. 10 3/4", .64 cal. ribbed octagonal to round barrel. Lock of traditional Spanish miquelet type, in good working order with powerful mainspring. Solid stock, no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, fitted with belt hook, fine steel inlay of a style popular in Ripoll as early as the mid-17th century. The two holes seen above and below the pointed tail of the lock were formed by the nails used to secure the usual leather/cloth pad to protect the trigger finger from the tip of the mainspring bearing on the heel of the cock. This pad is almost always long since missing on miquelets. Original wood ramrod with turned steel tip. In W. Keith Neal's "Spanish Guns and Pistols", pl.58, is illustrated a very similar pistol dated 1780, same form of stock (no inlay, however), same type barrel band secured by band spring. Neal also shows (pl.15) a Portuguese wheel-lock pistol (c. 1650) with this same sort of grip - apparently, this unique form developed early on the Iberian Peninsula, and has no special connection with Catalonia. I have used the term "Catalan" since this grip form does strongly resemble the so-called Catalan stock found on Spanish longarms, and immediately brings to mind the distinctive down-curving form. See also a "Ripoll Blunderbuss Pistol" (c.1750), plates 103-4, "Spanish Military Weapons in Colonial America 1700-1821" by Brinckerhoff & Chamberlain. The authors call its stock "Spanish/Catalan". A good and all-original early Spanish pistol in VG+ condition with smooth clean metal overall.    $3,600    
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1860) Cased Pair of German Target or Duelling Pistols 1853-60. 9 1/2", .41 cal. fluted octagonal barrels, numbered 1 and 2 in gold inlay, one marked "PETER SCHENK", the other "IN MARIENBAD" also gold inlay. Hook breeches, standing breeches numbered 1 and 2 in gold inlay. Bores are bright mint, deeply rifled. Engraved locks marked in gold inlay with "PETER SCHENK" and "IN MARIENBAD" respectively. Locks in perfect working order. Excellent+, like new, stocks with sharp edges and crisp carving, silver barrel key escutcheons, oval silver escutcheon with initials of owner, engraved iron mounts retain all fine original blue.

Barrels and locks also retain all fine original blue. Overall the guns are in all respects like new, showing no wear. The quality of the engraving and stock carving is of the best, both looking as if they were done yesterday. Case retains all original lining in fine condition, maker's name on lid liner. Accessories include a mold, made with the same attention to precision as the guns; nipple wrench that doubles as a screwdriver with two blades; a spoon-like powder scoop; a silver and horn powder flask (missing spout); a horn-headed mallet / loading rod and a cleaning rod with horn knob. The case is sound, with many german silver inlays, though all the 1/2" wide, thin right angled edge straps are missing. They were not structural, decorative only for the case is still solid. These straps would not be hard to replace, they were merely glued on. Fortunately, the much more difficult to duplicate corner mounts remain, as do the lock escutcheon and lid plate.
   $12,500  
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1861) Wilkinson Sword of Col. Eden Vansittart, Indian Army and Royal Army, DSO, Col.of the 8th Gurkha Rifles and Col. of the 8th Battalion Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment, 1914-15. 33" blade of regulation 1845 Infantry Officer's type, bears Wilkinson address, proof star, stamped with #21565 (1876), etched with Vansittart arms of eagle over two Maltese crosses over "E.VANSITTART". All etching clearly done by Wilkinson during sword's manufacture. There is no other etching on the fine+ condition blade, and never was. It has been professionally edged for combat. Wilkinson's ledger records proofing of sword # 21565 on "21 Sep. 1876 / 33 X 1 1/8 / Reg. Infantry / Mounted 10/10/76". The failure to enter the buyer's name is not unusual in the ledger. While the blade is certainly a post-1845 Infantry Officer's type (and this would make sense, since Vansittart was commissioned in his cadre, H.M. 63rd Foot), the flimsy brass hilt of the 1822-45 sword has been replaced by a steel fine quality Indian Army officer's version of the 1821 3-bar Light Cavalry type, a vastly more solid and protective guard. More of this below. The hilt is in fine condition, though the original shagreen grip covering shows the wear of considerable use and campaigning. The tang button is untouched. The scabbard is the correct post-1901 wood and leather field use pattern with correct plated steel mouth piece, all other mounts of leather.
Eden Vansittart was born April 19, 1856, son of Henry Vansittart, Civil and Session Judge of the Honorable East India Company Service. Although commissioned into the 63rd, it was always intended he enter the Indian Army, and on 20 July, 1877, Vansittart was appointed to the Madras Staff Corps, and commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Indian Army on Sept. 10, 1877. His War Services in India are as follows:
1881: North West Frontier, Mahsud-Waziri Expedition.
1888: NWF, Hasara Expedition.
1891: NWF, Hazara Campaign, (medal with clasp)
1897-98: NWF, Operations on the Samana and in the Kurram valley during August and Sept. 1897.
Operations of the Flying Column in the Kurram valley under Col. Richardson, 20 Aug. to 1 Oct. 1897. (medal with two clasps).

Considering Vansittart's Afghan campaigns, it is not surprising that he elected to get a more protective hilt for his sword, probably sooner rather than later. In India there were, of course, many depots and moreover, well-stocked outfitters that could cater to any British officer's or sportsman's requirements. If ever there was a place on earth where an officer with every chamber in his revolver expended could expect to face cold steel, it was the NWF. Naturally, Vansittart would ride on the march but dismount during operations, and here the shorter 33" infantry blade would serve him best if needed.

As a Captain in the 5th Gurkhas, Vansittart made himself an expert upon the Nepalese and its peoples, specifically the Gurkhas, to an extent any modern anthropologist might envy. His "Notes on Goorkhas - being a short account of their country, history, characteristic, clans, & etc. (1890)", published in Calcutta, 1890. It was inscribed by permission to the Commander-in-Chief, India, Sir F.S.Roberts, Bart., V.C., C.C.B., etc. It was intended as a guide to evaluation, recruitment, and proper treatment of the Gurkhas by British officers. Though the author maintains a scrupulous objectivity concerning the martial virtues of various clans, tribes and their affiliated groups, he describes and urges understanding of their proud genealogies and customs that were of such importance to the Gurkhas, and that their British officers would be wise to appreciate. He describes their "sturdy, unflinching courage, or daring elan", and ends Part III with a Gurkha saying "It is better die than to be a coward!"

Vansittart retired in 1913 and moved to England. He volunteered to return to the colors in 1914, and was given command of the 8th Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment, formed Sept. 12, 1914. On Sept. 26, 1915, the second day of the Battle of Loos, the Battalion received orders at about 10:30 AM to attack at 11 AM. At that hour, the men left the trenches, led in person by Colonel Vansittart, in an attack that quickly became a disaster. Thrown in on extremely short notice, promised flank support that failed to materialize, the Battalion found itself facing completely intact German wire that was supposed to have been destroyed by British artillery. It was decimated by concentrated machine gun fire from its front and both flanks. Casualties to other ranks were on the order of 60%, and of the 24 officer casualties, 13 were killed - only one officer remained unwounded. Col. Vansittart himself was gravely wounded, and initially reported killed in action; however, after hours in no man's land, he was found by the Germans and given medical care (and repatriation in 1917). For this action, he was mentioned in despatches, and later received the DSO. All the above research and more, including a modern reprint of his Gurkha monograph, is included with the sword.    $1,500  

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1862) Pattern 1816 Baker Rifleman's Saw Back Sword. 22" heavy blade with 9" false edge, Crown inspector's stamp crown over 1, maker's stamp "WOOLEY & SARGENT" (worn but unmistakable). All-brass hilt with extended lion mask pommel, designed so the inverted sword could be gripped by the knuckle-bow with the long pommel fitting into the palm of the hand and used as a saw. Blade is smooth and not over-cleaned, saw teeth are sharp. Hilt in fine condition, no damage.
Until 1997, this pattern was routinely passed off as a circa 1830's Pioneer sword. It was not until the esteemed Howard L. Blackmore published an article in Arms Collecting, Vol.35, No.1, 1997, that the true origin of this sword became known. In short, it is the sword developed to take the place of the sword bayonet on those Baker rifles modified to take a socket bayonet. The riflemen had found their brass hilted sword bayonets handy for chopping firewood, etc., and it was decided to replace it with a much more useful tool and weapon. Blackmore identified 8 Napoleonic era contractors whose names appeared on a group of these swords still in the Tower Armouries. Most of these contractors were long out of business in the 1830's. The original 1816 records were found, and the 8 named contractors were exactly those on the swords. In De Witt Bailey's work "British Military Flintlock Rifles" (pub. 2002), pp.143-4, this sword is also identified as the "Pattern 1816 Rifleman's saw-back Sword". Wooley is listed as contracting for 1000 of them, and Blackmore notes that the name actually stamped on the sword was "Wooley & Sargant".
   $850    
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1863) Fine Engraved Tranter Model 1868 Retailed by E.M. Reilly, London. 3" octagonal barrel marked ".450" (caliber), Birmingham proofs, and on top flat "E.M.Reilly & Co / 502 Oxford St London". 5-shot cylinder with Birmingham proofs and assembly # "71". Engraved frame marked "Tranters Patent" , serial # 40763. Loading gate with assembly # "71". Smooth, perfect action and indexing, like new. Bore is VG+, bright with only isolated areas of minor pitting. Checkered grip is ex.+, never cleaned, no dings, cracks or repairs, sharp checkering.

Overall, gun retains 90% fine nickel; thin but smooth dulled finish on bottom outside of trigger guard and buttcap- but their engraving is still sharp. See Black, Guerin, and Michaud "Tranter Cartridge Firearms" , pp. 114-5 for an identical model with same "late type" ejector. An excellent, all-original revolver.   $2,400  

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1864) Cased English Colt 1860 Army with London proofs and Steel Trigger Guard. 8", .44 cal barrel with address "ADDRESS COL.SAML COLT NEW YORK US AMERICA", London proofs. There is also a 2 1/2" professionally engraved Sanskrit (not Arabic) inscription on reverse side, indicating ownership by an Indian potentate or perhaps it is an inventory inscription of a noble's armoury. Cylinder bears London proofs. Blued steel trigger guard for sale at London depot. All matching serial # 154443 / L: barrel, wedge, trigger guard, backstrap, cylinder, cylinder arbor, frame.The "L" (for London) appears with full serial #'s on the barrel, frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. The wedge, cylinder and cylinder arbor are numbered 4443. The barrel retains 55-60% original fine blue, balance is smooth honest wear. Cylinder has some blue on rebated section, scene is complete with light wear. Hammer and frame (marked "COLTS / PATENT) retain much original case color; t.g. and backstrap about 10% original blue. The grip is solid with no cracks or repairs, retains 90%+ original varnish, has small chip at obverse toe. Action in fine working order and indexing; bore VG with strong rifling, clean with scattered light pitting. The small wedge spring is broken off and missing. The revolver has never been fooled with or cleaned. It is entirely original.

The case is in fine condition, partitioned in the London manner and retaining its original baize lining in ex. condition. It contains the original screwdriver / nipple wrench and the mold marked "COLTS PATENT" ; both tools retain most original blue, the mold with surface freckling from use. There is a packet of cartridges "FOR COLT'S ARMY PISTOL"; a typical English bag flask as found in most cased London Colts, just 2-3 very small dings, marked "JAMES DIXON / & SONS / SHEFFIELD"; a lacquered tin cap box with original label (faded but legible): "CHARLES NEPHEW & Co. / GUNSMITHS / OLD COURT HOUSE STREET / TANK SQUARE / CALCUTTA".("Tank" = large cistern or reservoir, a common feature of Indian civic architecture). Several conical bullets cast in the mold remain.
A fine, all-original cased English Colt.
   $6,000    

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1865) An Excellent Prussian Zundladelbuchse Modell 1865 Jaeger Rifle. 30" octagonal barrel, 15.43mm, turned round at muzzle for bayonet ring, lug on side flat, original foresight with brass backing for increased visibility, dovetailed block rear sight with four folding leaves (stamped with matching # 1361 to gun); marked "STAHL" over chamber, stamped with numerous proofing and inspectors' marks, serial # "1361". Receiver with many inspectors' marks, #"1361", Prussian eagle over "SPANDAU", "BB MOD 65", matching # 1361 on bolt body and cocking piece, bolt handle "61" (Dreyse bolt handles are separate pieces threaded into bolt body), receiver dated "1868 / 1869". Bolt retains needle. Action in perfect working order, as are the double set triggers. Bore is mint. Bolt retains original "in the white" polish. Barrel has sharp-edged flats, retains 95% original brown, as does the receiver. Original sling swivels. Stock is solid, never cleaned or re-finished, no cracks or repairs, shows little wear at all - just very minor handling marks, stamped on obverse butt with usual Prussian ownership marks (and an inventory # 1244 of some museum or institution), crown over "S" behind tail of trigger guard. Buttplate, screwheads everywhere, stamped "61". Matching "61" original ramrod with inspectors' stamps, knob head and cleaning jag end. This gun has not been given the Beck Transformation modification. A period paper label is stuck on the reverse buttstock. It bears very faded inked writing - too faded for me to read - only the large "65" at the end of the inscription can be made out. I would imagine that whatever institution stamped the obverse with 1444 put on this label. But to their credit they preserved the gun in ex. all-matching condition.   $5,200    
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1866) Cased Colt Pocket Model of 1849. 4", .31 cal. barrel marked "ADDRESS COL SAML COLT NEW=YORK USA AMERICA", serial # 298207. 5-shot cylinder with stagecoach scene and "COLTS PATENT 8207". Frame stamped "COLTS / PATENT", Trigger guard "31 CAL". All numbers are matching - barrel, wedge, frame, cylinder, cylinder arbor, trigger guard, backstrap. There is no loading lever #, and this is correct for this era. # 298207 was made in 1865, which started at 295001 and finished at 310000. Action is perfect, like new. Safety pins all intact, nipples like new with all blue intact. Bore is mint, and cylinder chambers retain original blue inside. Cylinder scene is perfect. Gun retains 99.5%+ original brilliant blue, no fading or drifting to plum at all. Loading lever, frame and hammer retain 100% original case colors.Grips are ex,+, near mint with only 1 or 2 tiny dings, next to no edge wear at all, retain all original varnish. The back-strap and trigger guard retain only a small amount of silver plating, and this is typical of late Colt percussion guns - the plating was much thinner than earlier production. This is a known fact of Colt collecting, with some experts recalling guns with mint blue (like this one), but with virtually no silver plating left. One dealer put it well when he speaks of the plating on these late Colts as being "...only a few atoms thick".
Case is in fine condition, no damage. Original blue baize lining in ex. condition, contains brass .31 cal mold marked "COLTS PATENT", casting round and conical bullets, fine condition showing little use; Flask is in fine condition with but 2-3 tiny dents, American eagle with shield and banner "PLURIBUS UNUM" (no "E"). Interestingly, there is an old stamp on the bottom of the case "NEW YORK CITY POST / TWO CENTS".
   $8,500  
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1867) A Very Rare Spanish Brass Mounted Model 1767 Dragoon Sword. 36 3/4" (measured from guard, 38" if measured from cross-guard) double-edged blade stamped on obverse "CLOSAS" and on reverse with Arrow Mark of the Barcelona Cutlers and "Crowned R" of Royal Ownership. (Magi Closas, Barcelona, 17601780, a known maker of this pattern). Heavy brass hilt of regulation pattern with leather covered wood grip, about 50% of this original leather remains though only a short piece of the original twisted brass wire wrap remains at the grip-collar junction. Smooth blade with deep clear markings, no damage to hilt, a fine original in all respects sword, completely undisturbed. See Brinckerhoff & Chamberlain, "Spanish Military Weapons in Colonial America 17001821", plates 164-65 for exact type; see also Brinckerhoff p.80 for reference to brass hilted dragoon swords in Havana inventory of 1771. Brinckerhoff thought that the example he illustrates (from the Army Museum, Madrid) was the only known specimen. In fact, several others have survived, and are discussed and illustrated on line by Juan L. Calvo (May, 2006). These swords are a type first proposed and drawn by Garcia Ramirez de Arellano in 1767, and put into production for Dragoons shortly thereafter. The pattern equipped Spanish Dragoons during much of the reign of Carlos III (1759-88). The hilt type is known in Spanish as "barquilla con vela en laton" (boat with candle in brass) - in English such a guard is often referred to as "boatshell". Arellano wrote that the brass hilt would be as durable as the traditional iron/steel guards previously used by Spanish Dragoons (and that would be again in the last years of the 18th century), but as Juan Calvo puts it "...the rare presence in museums and collections..." of this type seems to prove Arellano wrong. In fairness, this pattern is at least every bit as sturdy as many French, Prussian and other European troopers' brass cavalry hilts, though these comparatively wealthier states may have tolerated a higher rate of damage attrition than Spain could. Aside from loss through damage, Calvo points out that these hilts could be melted down for other armaments - we do know the blades were re-used on later, steel-hilted swords. Stretched to the limit and beyond by a far-flung empire, Spain had to resort to such measures. When one considers the attrition of the Napoleonic and Carlist Wars, the extreme rarity of what was never a common sword becomes understandable.   $4,250  
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1868) Magazine for Remington 1882/85 Rifle, cal.45-70. Marked "REMINGTON" with patent dates. Ex. condition with 90% original dark finish. Complete, no dents.    $75  
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1869) British pack of 10 "DRILL" cartridges, all 10 rounds present, paper somewhat tattered.   $15    
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1870) British "OFFICIAL COPY / FIELD SERVICE REGULATIONS". Covers all conceivable operations and situations from A to Z. "THIS MANUAL IS ISSUED BY COMMAND OF THE ARMY COUNCIL / WAR OFFICE / 10th NOVEMBER, 1914" 302 pages. Original, not a reprint, in good condition.    $50  
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1871) Brass sight cover and cleaning rod guide (to preserve rifling at muzzle) for a 3-band Volunteer target .577 Enfield or Snider such as were used in "Service Rifle" matches. End unscrews and could presumably be replaced with a solid cover. I have fitted this on a 3-band Snider converted from Enfield; it fits perfectly.   $35    
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1872) Brass and cork muzzle plug for .577 rifle. Not a repro.    $35    
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1873) Napoleonic French Hussar or Light Infantry Officer's saber in the Hussar style. 28 1/2" blade with clip point, signed at forte with maker's initials, but difficult to read under langet, etched with trophy of arms, half moon etc., surface is smooth with scattered light pitting in places and patina. Brass mounted hilt and scabbard; hilt in fine condition except for some loss to the original wire wrap. Leather grip covering in 100% complete and fine condition. The ridged motif on the langets is duplicated on the knuckle bow. Scabbard in fine condition, virtually no dents or damage to mounts, original leather with intact seam. Circa 1800-05.    $1,400  
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1874) Tooled Leather Rifle Case c. 1880. In good condition, retaining its original shoulder strap. It appears to have been professionally lengthened 9", certainly during its period of use. I've had it for years - it could accept standard 1873 Winchester with full mag and 24" barrel (tight, but the gun went in and the flap closed). I don't guarantee such a fit today, for leather can age and shrink, but it gives an idea of the size of gun it was made for. 46" overall. It would look great hanging beside an appropriate period rifle.    $75  
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1875) Bavarian Wall Gun (Wallbuchse) Model 1824/60. 36" heavy swamped octagonal barrel, stamped with Amberg Arsenal marks at breech, approx. 90 cal. rifled with 7 deep grooves, fitted with second type rear sight to take advantage of the much increased range of the Podewils-Minie bullet that came into use in 1860. Lock marked "AMBERG"; both it and the double-set triggers are in ex. working order. Bore is a bit dark, but rifling is deep and clear. Weight approx. 30 lbs. Smooth even patina on all metal, all markings strong and clear. Fine solid stock, no repairs or cracks. Complete and in fine condition; an interesting gun.   $3,500    
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1876) Emancipation Proclamation, executed by artist Gilman R.Russell, "Prof. of Penmanship". "Published by Act of Congress in the year 1865" and also printed by "D.S.Duoal & Son, Phila". Original gilt frame 27 X 20 1/2", original wood backing. I bought this from a Canadian antique dealer over 25 years ago. The original glass was cracked from side to side in the middle, and I had it replaced by correct thin glass. The crack in the glass did not in any way affect the print itself or leave any trace. Everything else is original to 1865. The print is in fine condition with only very light discoloring in two small unimportant areas, no tears or damage, repairs, restoration, or missing paper. It is in far better original condition than ones I have seen offered on line costing more than I ask at    $1,200  
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1877) An Original English Print of the Napoleonic Era. Depicts two Heavy Cavalrymen, entitled "A Private of the 2nd or Royal North British Dragoons (Greys)". In tiny letters "aquatinted by L.C.Stadler". Frame size 13 X 10 3/4". A well-known print that is often illustrated in arms publications. The attention to detail is far superior to most period military prints. The 1796 H.C. carbine and 1796 H.C. sword are very accurately delineated, unlike the vague generic weaponry so often depicted in other military prints of the period. Genuine early 19th century print of the Scots Greys in fine condition   $125    
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1878) An Exquisite Model of the USN Gunboat "HAWKINS". Length of hull 13 3/4", length o.a. 18 1/2", beam 5". Made 1987 by noted model maker R.Smolka. Hull is built plank by plank. The condition and quality of workmanship is very high - I will let the pictures speak for themselves.
The Hawkins participated in the anti-pirate campaigns in Tripoli in the early 19th century. Backed up by USN frigates off-shore, these shallow draught gunboats could reach the corsair vessels and land defences where the larger ships dared not go for fear of reefs and uncharted shallows.
No damage or repairs. My price of $375.00 is less than the original owner paid back in 1987.
   $375  
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1879) A Fine Post-1809 (Second Type) India Pattern Brown Bess. 39", .75 cal. barrel with proper Ordnance proofs - GR Broad Arrow, etc., barrel inspector's stamp of crown over number in correct place near touch hole. Lock marked with "CROWN over GR", "TOWER", crown over Broad Arrow inspector's stamp. Lock is in ex. crisp working order. All metal is smooth, with fine clear markings. Fine solid stock with no cracks or repairs, never refinished or cleaned, brass mounts in fine condition. Original rammer and sling swivels. A fine Ordnance musket, of the type most used in the later Peninsular Campaign and at Waterloo.    $2,800    
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1880) A Nice Quality Overcoat Pistol by Patrick, Liverpool. 5", .53 cal. oct. barrel, engraved "LIVERPOOL" and with platinum line at breech, upper flat engraved "MAKER TO THE DUKE OF GLOUCESTER". Engraved lockplate with maker "PATRICK", bolted safety. Ex. crisp working order. Fine+ solid stock, no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, fine checkering on bag grip, engraved iron mounts, silver barrel key and wrist escutcheons. Wrist escutcheon depicts a long horned animal (goat?) neck and head atop a coronet. This pistol is a very well done conversion to percussion, performed by an accomplished gunsmith/engraver, that does justice to the pistol's quality. Edward Patrick of Liverpool is variously listed as c. 1780-1830 or 1805-30. He is the only Patrick noted as the maker to the Duke of Gloucester. His widow, Ann, carried on the business to 1832.   $1,100  
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1881) Fine Pocket Pistol by William & John Rigby, Dublin. 3 1/2" , .55 cal. barrel with sighting groove engraved "DUBLIN", double platinum lines at breech and platinum blow-out plug. Swivel rammer. Hook breech. Barrel retains faint traces of original stripe finish. Back-action lock signed "Wm & In RIGBY", fine scroll engraving, ex. crisp working order. (note letter I often used rather than J, though usually in earlier eras). Solid, uncleaned iron mounted stock, silver escutcheons on wrist and bottom of characteristic Irish fish-tail checkered grip, no cracks or repairs, retains much original varnish. The standing breech, hammer and lock retain most original dark finish. All metal is smooth. This pistol does not bear the stampings of the Registration Act of 1843, rescinded in August 1846. While it might mean the gun somehow escaped the markings, it probably means it was made after 1846, circa 1850. Stockel dates William & John Rigby as working in Dublin 1824-58. Other sources state they exhibited at the Great London Exhibition of 1851. A quality pistol by a famous firm in fine condition.    $1,400  
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1882) An Impressive 4-Barrel O.U. Pistol by Edward M.Reilly in Excellent Condition. 4 3/4", .45 cal barrels with Birmingham proofs, unusually thick-walled for powerful charges, resulting in a heavy barrel cluster apparently machined and filed very skillfully from a single piece. The lower pair of barrels are rotated 180 degrees to bring them into firing position after the upper pair are discharged. Case-hardened action in ex. crisp working order, engraved on top "E.M. REILLY & Co / 315 OXFORD STREET / LONDON". Stockel lists the firm at 502 Oxford St. 1847-60; Gardner records "Reilly, Edward M.& Co. - 502 New Oxford Street, London, England, with a branch at 315 Oxford Street". Like Rigby, E.M.Reilly also exhibited at the 1851 London Exhibition. The grip is in ex.+ condition with crisp overall checkering, silver escutcheon, no cracks, repairs or dings, showing virtually no wear, case colored buttplate with hinged cap box. Gun is in overall excellent+ condition; barrels retain 95% fine original dark blue; action and buttplate 95% case colors which were muted even when new, rather than flamboyant. All original, no damage or repairs.    $3,600    
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1883) A Good British Snider MkII**, 3-Band Infantry Rifle. Standard length 36 1/2" barrel, with usual proofs of Broad Arrow over "WD" , "VR" over crossed sceptres, etc. Lock marked "Crown / 1864 / ENFIELD", "Crown over VR". Action and lock in ex. crisp, tight working order, bore is ex.++ bright virtually mint. Barrel retains nearly all original smooth blue turning plum. Original pin protector, sling swivels and ramrod. Fine+ stock, never cleaned or refinished, no cracks or repairs, only a few very minor service dings, stamped with rondel "Crown / RM / ENFIELD" over "1" for First Class Arm. Left side butt stamped "DC" in diamond for Dominion of Canada. Brass mounts with matching light mustard patina, buttplate stamped with unit markings "F 282". The lockplate date 1864 identifies this as one of the last series of muzzleloading Enfields manufactured, which had interchangeable parts. These especially were considered the best for conversion to breech loading, though by 1869, the stock of Enfields considered suitable for conversion had run out, and the all-new MkIII was introduced.
Do not mistake this for one of the Sniders sent by tens of thousands to Egypt, India, Nepal, etc. These guns received long and hard service in hot climates, and they show it. Canada fought only one brief campaign with the Snider, the North-West Rebellion of 1885, and only a relative handful of the 60,000 Sniders of all types in Canada by 1875 were present. The rest remained in Militia depots and arsenals, and were well taken care of. This is one of them.
   $975  
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1884) Large British Swivel Blunderbuss (Espingole), Early 19th Century. 24" heavy brass barrel, 12 bore expanding to 2" at muzzle (outer bell muzzle 3"); stamped with Birmingham proofs and "12". Weight of gun is 24 1/2 lbs, intended for heavy charges. Lock marked "COOPER / LONDON". Entry in M.Carey "English, Irish and Scottish Firearms Makers", P.20, "Cooper (about 1790) Shop in London. Made brass barrel, bell muzzle, flintlock swivel boat gun". Although Stockel lists many Coopers, only one had a shop in London, and in the right era: "Cooper, Hugh, London GB, erw 1801". With these two entries, I think we've found our man. Lock in ex. working order. Fine solid stock, no cracks or repairs, never refinished, brass furniture with flat Sea Service type buttplate. Original ramrod. Swivel fitted with retaining key, the significance of which is best explained by William Gilkerson in "Boarders Away II", p.103, in his discussion of espingoles. Also on this page is an illustration of a swivel blunderbuss virtually identical to this one, including the retaining key on swivel. I will quote verbatim from Gilkerson's chapter "Little Artillery", since he does a better job of explaining the retaining key's purpose than I could: "All were used like the swivel cannons and similarly stationed, although an espingole's swivel did not need a heavy stanchion or bitt as a mounting; an unreinforced cap rail was sufficiently strong to absorb the lighter gun's recoil. Hence, espingoles could easily be employed at stations where heavier guns could not be used, in fact anywhere along the rails or bulkheads. Aloft, they did not need the heavy curb required for a cannon or howitzer; the espingole's swivel pinion could socket directly into the squaring staff - the wooden spreader streching at a convenient swivel-height across the topmast shrouds. The shrouds were seized to the staff in order to prevent the deadeye-lanyards from twisting under tension, and the spring afforded by these ropes easily took up the light gun's recoil. Perhaps in anticipation of use on this station, some espingole swivel pinions were slotted and keyed at their bottoms to keep them from leaping out of their socket with the recoil's back-whip from the cordage. No restraining system was needed for pinions socketed in a fixed timber or rail". Included with the gun is a fine wood mounting. The strap around the butt is necessary because the gun is muzzle heavy on the swivel. A fine example and completely original in all respects, untouched, with a smooth deep patina on the brass barrel.    $6,000  
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1885) A Rare 17th/18th Century Venetian Naval Cutlass. 28 1/2" stiff, double-edged blade, stamped with armourer's mark both sides (resembles a pair of X's). Light pitting on upper half, light to moderate medium pitting towards tip. Large iron semi-bowl guard of characteristic form with long quillon and knuckle bow secured to the shiavona-like pommel by wire (a method used on many shiavonas). The circular stamp on the upper bowl is almost certainly the remains of the typical Lion of St. Mark stamp seen on many earlier shiavonas. Wood grip retains original leather in good condition.
The picture of this pattern cutlass and the catalog entry in Italian comes from "L'Armeria Castello Di Moncelice", 1980. The catalog reads under the heading "Venice 17th Century"; "Two Naval Boarding Swords". This is the first of these distinctive swords I have owned, or even seen outside a book.
   $1,500  
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1886) A Scarce Early English Naval Cutlass c. 1690 - 1700. 29", curved single fuller blade marked both sides with running wolf (or fox), and anchor. According to the literature, these marks are often found on these swords. Brass hilt of same type found on wrecks dating to 1694 and 1703 (see W.Gilkerson, "Boarders Away", p.74, no.s 3 and 4). Fine condition overall, untouched tang peen, no damage or restoration. Completely original in all respects.    $1,800    
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1887) Cross Belt Plate of the Carmarthen Militia c.1803. 2 7/8 X 2 1/4", with Prince of Wales plumes, "39" and "ROYAL CAERMARTIN FUSEL". The Carmarthen Militia was raised in 1763, becoming "Royal" in 1799, and raised to Fuselier status in 1803. The regiment drew the number 39 in the 1803 ballot. Condition is untouched, deep age patina.    $390  
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1888) French Model 1777 Bayonet. 18" blade with markings as seen in pics, elbow also marked. VG+ condition, smooth light age patina overall, complete and untouched.   $140  
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1889) Sudanese Kaskara, Late 19th Century. 35" heavy double edged blade well-etched with Arabic (probably Koranic) inscriptions and two cartouches of typical Islamic style. Blade is generally smooth, especially in area of inscriptions, small scattered patches of light-medium pitting. Hilt entirely covered in sewn leather matching scabbard. Scabbard in fine condition, showing some wear, original shoulder strap. An unknown (to me) species of animal with fur and nasty claws was persuaded to donate some body parts to create the upper and middle mounts.
The inscriptions are executed with skill and precision. They are entirely legible and certainly not of the quickly scribbled for decorative effect variety. Though I make no pretense to read Arabic, I can on occasions discern a date, and on this blade very clearly appears the Muslim date of 1174 over the character "seneh" which often underlines a date. This equates to a dating from Aug.13, 1760 AD, to Aug.2, 1761 AD (the Muslim year is based upon the lunar year, not the solar year). That a kaskara would employ an earlier blade is not unusual - early blades were accorded great respect. VG+ condition overall.
   $475  
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1890) A Good Caucasian/Russian Kindjal with Silver Niello Mounts. 12 3/4" double edged substantial blade with characteristic off-set fullers in ex. smooth condition. Fine quality silver niello mounts in ex. condition, solid horn grips, scabbard leather in fine condition. A good late 19th century kindjal in nice condition.    $700  
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1891) Royal Navy Pattern 1804 Cutlass. 29" blade stamped "GR" with inspector's stamp Crown over 4, maker "BATE" stamped on back. Blade is smooth with light age patina. Original leather washer at blade/hilt junction. Hilt is smooth dark age patina retaining some original black paint. A fine example of the 1804 cutlass, no damage or restoration.    $1,350  
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1892) Napoleonic French Year XI Light Cavalry Saber. 34 1/2" blade of regulation pattern, marked on back in French "MANUFACTURE DE SOLINGEN" KS&G", stamped with poincon "C" in circle (came poincon stamped on scabbard drag). Blade is mostly smooth with isolated areas of light/medium pitting. Hilt in fine condition, grip retains all original leather, knuckle-bow stamped with # 171 (matched on scabbard). Scabbard has only one small, shallow dent on reverse near drag, is otherwise undented with smooth light patina, stamped 171. This sword, given its late manufacture, is a good candidate for use at Waterloo.    $2,200  
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1893) Napoleonic French Officer's Pistol by Pirmet, Paris. 7 1/4" large bore .70 cal., prominently swamped oct. barrel with poly-groove rifling, engraved on top flat "FOURN PAR PIRMET A PARIS" (worked 1779-1818). Blade foresight and V rear sight. Reduced size lock of 1777 / An IX type with angled brass pan, retains 1777 type frizzen with turned-over tip. Lock in ex. crisp working order. Fine iron mounted solid stock, never refinished, no cracks or repairs, fine checkering on grip. Original ramrod with threaded end. French proofmarks appear on left flat at breech. The general format of this pistol resembles the Model 1811 Officer's pistol - same style stock, same iron fore end cap and butt cap, same lock, checkering pattern, etc. It differs in having an octagonal barrel and a slightly fancier trigger guard (the M.1816 Officer's pistol lock reverted to a conventional steel pan without the angle). Officers could, of course, purchase a pair of pistols from a private maker as long as they were of suitable quality and close to the official pattern. Pirmet was one of the foremost gunmakers of Paris, official Gunmaker to Jerome Bonaparte, King of Westphalia 1807-13; in later years he enjoyed the patronage of the Duke of Angouleme and Louis XVIII. Entirely original in every respect; a relatively plain (no gold damas or silver wire inlay) but very well made pistol as befits an officer on campaign.

Note: I include in the pics a pair of Lepage a Paris pistols given by a grateful Napoleon during his exile on St.Helena to Dr. Arnott of the 20th Regiment, who had alleviated some of the ex-Emperor's medical complaints temporarily, shortly before his death. Later, circa 1826, Dr. Arnott gave these pistols to an old friend, Colonel South, also of the 20th. Through a chain of transmission composed of several other known British officers, these pistols were donated to the School of Musketry in 1865. They are now in the Weapons Museum of the School of Infantry at Warminster. Their close resemblance to the Pirmet pistol is striking. Of course, Napoleon had many other pistols and longarms, most of them lavishly decorated such as the gold-mounted Boutet arms. However, although Napoleon as a young officer and general had attired himself in fashionable costume on the battlefield and in public life, as Emperor he chose a much more severe and plain dress than any of his Marshals (except at ceremonial state functions, naturally). Wearing the simple overcoat of a Colonel's field dress, perhaps such pistols might have seemed more appropriate in his saddle holsters than a pair of gold-mounted Boutet confections.
   $1,950  
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1894) Training Model of U.S.S. Hamilton, 4-Stack 75-185 Class. Model constructed in 1942 by a Chief Petty Officer to train new recruits, 39" in length, of very fine detail and accuracy. Contained in its original plywood carrying case (44" long) with internal fixtures which firmly secure it and its delicate masts and wireless equipment. Solid wood hull. It should be remembered that many young Navy recruits came from places like Kansas, Nebraska, etc., and had never seen a ship in their in their lives (opportunities for tourism being somewhat restricted in the Great Depression), let alone a warship. Port, starboard? Why not just left or right? Bow, stern? Many words and concepts that most had never considered in their short lives, yet would now become a matter of life or death for them. But they were merely ignorant, not stupid, and would learn quickly. Such a model would be an excellent introduction. Preserved by the original carrying case, the model is in excellent original condition, with no damage, repairs or restoration. It is exactly the way it was in 1942.    $850  
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1895) Gold Retractable Pencil c. 1850-60. Presented by Captain Joseph Archambault for "SKILL AT TARGET SHOOTING". 4 1/2" long, apparently of solid gold, not merely gilded. Engraved " "PRESENTED BY / CAPT. J. ARCHAMBAULT / U.T. OF C. / BUCKS COUNTY / SKILL AT TARGET SHOOTING". Archambault was born in 1796, fought at Waterloo, and came to the U.S. shortly afterward, becoming a successful merchant. He was active in the Pennsylvania Militia, and formed the "Garde Lafayette" in 1858, a militia unit composed completely of native Frenchmen. At the outset of the Civil War, he recruited a company of cavalry which eventually became Company A, PA Volunteer Cavalry. Archambault was commissioned as a Captain on Sept. 10, 1861, and promoted to Major of the regiment May 19, 1862. He served until May, 1863. The retractable pencil was invented in England in 1822, and appears in various forms, this being one of them. Some, like this one, incorporated a pen nib as well (though the nib in this one no longer slides out). The pencil lead is present, and extends and retracts properly. Solid gold retractable pencils were popular with those who could afford them-bear in mind they are hollow tubes, so the amount of gold is not that much. This one has a hollow bulbous, chiseled head enclosing an imitation diamond. The pencil shows no wear to speak of, even along the edges that the two operating collars slide - just where you would expect a gilded surface to wear, exposing the base metal beneath. Among the pics is a painting of Archambault c. 1840, in a PA Militia uniform.    $400  
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A Request) Can anyone out there translate or shed some light on what I am sure is an inscription done in India? It is on the barrel of a London cased and proved .44 Colt Army, all matching, blue steel trigger guard, case contains cap box with the label of a Calcutta outfitter. Since I don't know which way is up, I provide two views. My thanks in advance. Click Here for Photo 1     Click Here for Photo 2
Note: I have on hand a Lee-Metford Mk.II dated 1893 in less than outstanding condition. But many of its parts, including the wood, are in good condition. It has not been sporterized or modified, and has no Eastern markings anywhere. Price $375. Call for further description.

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