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SEEKING TO OBTAIN THROUGH PURCHASE OR TRADE:
The following Napoleonic era British swords: 1796 Heavy Cavalry Officers and Troopers swords; 1796 Light Cavalry Officers swords; 1803 Infantry Officers swords; Scottish Officers swords; any officers sword with Regimental device, markings, etc., on hilt or blade. Naval officers swords, dirks. (all the above must be in VG to fine or better condition and with scabbards, no restoration) Good examples of British military firearms pre-1898.

WANTED: Fine British Military Firearms, Pre-1898; also, British Military and Naval swords, Enlisted and Officer's Patterns. Also, Scottish and British Basket-Hilted Swords.

PRICES DO NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING

1403) "Armurier et Arquebusier". 54 plates and text. Circa 1760 tome containing the full-size ( 10 X 15 1/2" ) military plates and text of Diderot's Encyclopedia. Plates illustrate gun manufacturing and tools; military musket components; 5 plates of infantry musket drill; 15 plates of complex infantry formations and evolutions (too many to picture all); Vauban fortification plans and siege methods; canno, mortars, carriages, siege weapons, etc. Marbled covers detached from spine, which has above title in gold letters. All plates and text pages are in fine condition     Reduced to $500  
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1608) Indian Katar, 17th - 18th Century. 12" triple-fullered blade cut down from Firangi (European) sword blade. Areas of guard chiseled with foliage patterns, remainder pierced with myriad small square holes. Shows fine workmanship and great age, though metal is generally smooth overall.   $675    
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1658) Webley Model 1883 Police Revolver. 2 1/2", .450 cal. barrel with Birmingham proofs, correct German silver foresight. 6-shot cylinder with Bir. proofs in flutes, face stamped ".450" and "892" (last 3 digits of SN on frame). Frame marked with serial # "88892 , .450 / POLICE / WEBLEY'S / handcuffed hands / M.P. /1430" and Bir. proof. Topstrap marked "P.WEBLEY & SON / LONDON and BIRMINGHAM". Solid uncleaned checkered grip, no cracks or repairs, several shallow pressure marks on right side. Ex. crisp like new working order and indexing; ex.+ bright bore with sharp rifling. Metal retains 20% original bright blue, remainder smooth honest service wear with a small areas very light pepper-salt. This exact model was derived from the famous RIC revolver, and adopted by the Metropolitan London Police in 1883, as well as by many other police forces throughout the Empire. The # 1430 is the issue # of some police force, so well-stamped I believe it was applied by Webley as part of the order. Regarding the handcuffed wrists, I quote from Dowell's "The Webley Story", p.66 "....the frame is stamped with the Webley trade mark depicting a pair of handcuffed hands. This trade mark was used on weapons issued to police forces"; see also pl.38c for the identical model."     Reduced to $1,100  
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1667) Cased Pair of Italian Double Barrel Pistols c. 1850. 6 1/2" , .69 cal. barrels with hook breeches retain much original genuine twist finish, ribs engraved "A.SCARPATI NAPOLI". Back-action locks engraved "A.SCARPAT" (obverse; "NAPOLI" (reverse). All four locks in ex. crisp like new working order; nipples show no wear. Fine+ stocks, never cleaned, no restoration, ex. checkered grips, engraved steel mounts smooth with no pitting. Buttcaps are spring-loaded to swivel sideways to provide storage for spare caps. Original brass tipped ramrods with threaded ends.
Cased retains fine original green baize lining. Original mold, cleaning tools and steel rod threaded to accept wire brush and steel jag. Screwdriver missing. Three fitted brass boxes for wads, caps, and bullets. Sixteen holes, 11 at front and 5 at back, to hold prepared paper cartouches, providing four reloads for both guns. This explains the lack of a powder flask or a space to hold one. Leather tabs allow entire compartmented interior to be removed from case. Case fitted on both ends with flush-fitted folding brass handles. Case exterior has several grain cracks, scratches, small bit of veneer missing from one bottom corner, though overall condition is good. A gunmaker named Scarpati is dated as working in Naples 1770-92; while obviously he could not have made these pistols, he is likely an ancestor.
Suitable for a traveling gentleman or military officer, these pistols date from an era of turmoil in Italy, the time of Garibaldi and Risorgimento, and eventual unification as the Kingdom of Italy in 1861."
     Reduced to $3,600    
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1673) British Indian Army Mountain Artillery Senior NCO's Sword. 30" strongly curved blade with 10" back edge, is identical in form to British Mountain Artillery Pattern 1896. Stamped with maker's mark "JOHN ROUND & SON / LIMITED / SHEFFIELD" , this mark partly overstruck with date '8 '15 (possibly '13) and inspector's stamp. Obverse with Broad Arrow and twice struck Crown over 1D over E ( I'm pretty sure it's "1D" and not "ID"). John Round & Son Limited is listed in Sheffield at Tudor St. from 1874 to 1932 as a "Silversmith, Electroplater, Knife and Swordmaker" (R.H. Bezdek, "Swords and Sword Makers of England and Scotland", p.214). Hilt is of some base metal, probably brass, non-magnetic, heavily silver plated. The silver shows virtually no wear, though it is tarnished black in some areas. Grip covered in shagreen, bound with silver and copper wire. Tang button is undisturbed. Blade is smooth, no pitting just light patina; grip and guard are ex. condition, showing no appreciable wear. I am not entirely certain of my attribution, but the hilt has the subtle look of the Indian Army version of the 1821 L.C. guard. Combining this with the date (1913 or 1915), the Crown ownership and the form of the blade, plus the quality silver plate, I conclude it to be a sword of a senior NCO of the Indian Mountain Artillery.    $450  
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1686) Webley RIC Pattern Revolver issued to Toronto Police Force. 3 1/2" barrel, correct german silver fore sight, Birmingham proofs. Frame with Bir. proof, marked on reverse side "TPF" (Toronto Police Force) in large engraved letters (this is a known group), "525", Webley trade mark of Winged Bullet over "W&S", "WEBLEY'S / R.I.C. / No.1.442 CF" over serial # 101748 (matching # 748 on rear of cylinder). The "525" is likely a TPF number, continuing a ledger record of guns that began long before this order to Webley, and from the look of it, stamped by Webley from a block of numbers sent by the police. Top strap stamped "P.WEBLEY & SON / LONDON & BIRMINGHAM". Crisp, like new working order and indexing, bright nearly mint bore and chambers, overall retains 85% original bright blue. Grip ex.+, looks almost new, shows no wear, dents, cracks or repairs. Revolver is in ex. all original condition.    $1,850    
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1694) An Impressive French Hunting Dagger, Second Half 18th Century. 12 1/2" strongly curved, thick and heavy (to function as cleaver), 2 1/8" wide blade with pronounced clip point, of excellent workmanship to rival the best of any bladesmith's work. Smooth with no pitting and just small areas of light surface stain. Original green baize throat washer. Hilt with high quality brass mounts, finely hand chased and engraved, retain small traces of original gilding, ebonized spiral carved original grip capped with pommel ensuite with cross-guard. Brass mounted, leather covered wood scabbard retains 99% original leather with some slight surface scuffing that does not detract from the dramatic effect of the dagger which is in fine condition, no repairs or restoration, impressive in style, quality, weight and condition.      Reduced to $2,000  
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1711) British Pattern 1899 Cavalry Saber with Rare Experimental Leather and Wood Scabbard. 33 1/2" blade marked "EFD" (Enfield), Broadarrow, dated ' 01 (1901). Steel guard with overall even light pitting, stamped "EFD" with inspector's stamp, checkered leather grips in fine condition. Scabbard in fine+ condition, made with wood body fitted with a 4" steel upper mount with two fixed rings, and a 6" steel drag, the whole covered with leather from throat to the barely exposed drag (a magnet revealed the lengths of the steel mounts). Leather is in fine sound condition, perfect intact seam, shows little wear, stamped on back near ring with inspectors' stamps, date " ' 01" , "99" (pattern), "EFD". Blade is ex.+ with nearly all original polish. A rare experimental type developed in light of South African War experience. See Robson, "Swords of the British Army", Revised edition, p.57, for an account of the production of these scabbards, apparently for troop trials.    $650  
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1716) Massive Zeiss Made Dutch Army Artillery Rangefinder. 33" end to end, many brass knobs, dials, etc. A brass plaque reads "NEDINSCO / 'S GRAVENHAGE / SYSTEM / CARL ZEISS / JENA". The various dials, etc., are in Dutch. Leather pads at ends are in fine condition. Box is original with modern brass latch. Probably made 1930's, but maybe earlier. A heavy (25 lbs), beautifully made precision instrument that must have cost a fortune in its day. With folding tripod clamp for field service.    $250  
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1721) An Excellent Model 1858 Starr DA .44 Revolver. 6" barrel, .44 cal. Frame marked right side "STARR'S PATENT JAN. 15 1856", left side "STARR ARMS CO. NEW YORK". Many parts have small "in house" inspectors' letters like "W" or "H". Matching serial # 7910 on cylinder and frame. Ex.+ grip, no cracks or repairs, clear inspectors' cartouches both sides. Action in perfect crisp working order, like new. Bore is bright mint. Overall gun retains 90% original brilliant blue. Cylinder has flaked to smooth light plum with patches of bright blue, much blue in rebated area around the perfect nipples and the chambers retain nearly all their blue. Hammer and loading lever retain ex. case colors. All screwheads in perfect shape. A great example, 100% original.      Reduced to $3,200  
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1722) Excellent Cased Model 1867 Mk II Adams Revolver. 6" barrel, .450 CF cal., top marked "ADAMS PATENT SMALL ARMS Co 331 STRAND LONDON" , stamped with tiny London view and proof marks. Cylinder with London proofs, serial # 4703 which matches #4703 stamped on frame. Right side frame "ADAMS PATENT" in oval, Adams "TRADE MARK" near grip. Action in perfect like new working order, chambers and bore mint bright. Ex.+ to mint grip, no cracks, chips, or repairs, crisp unworn checkering. Gun retains 98% perfect bright original blue. There is a small flaked area on front of trigger guard, slight wear to blue on part of the front edge of the cylinder. Perfect screw heads. Case contains cleaning rod, screwdriver, glass oil bottle. Original ex. green baize lining. Original trade label depicts this Mk II Model, gives extensive operating instructions, notes the Adams adopted by H.M. War Dept., London Police, etc. Case in fine condition, never refinished, has a partial grain crack in wood of bottom, otherwise no damage. An outstanding condition gun and case. 100% original in all respects.    $4,500    
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1733) Cased British Double-Action Tranter model 1856 Revolver. 6", .54 bore (.44 cal.) barrel, Bir. proofs, loading lever stamped "TRANTER'S PATENT". Frame marked "No. 13714.T.", "TRANTER'S PATENT", 5-shot cylinder with Bir. proofs. Spring-loaded cylinder pin retainer, and safety lever to lock cylinder in intermediate position between nipples. Action in ex. crisp working order, double or single action. Checkered grip in ex. condition, no cracks or repairs.. Bore is ex., bright with sharp rifling. Overall gun retains 80%+ ex. bright original blue(note that Tranter cylinders received a dull gray casehardening, not blue), remaining surface smooth plum patina. Gun is overall Very Fine to Ex. Case retains all original green baize lining. Original double cavity mold stamped "TRANTER'S PATENT"; ex. condition original bag flask with adjustable spout; original screwdriver and nipple wrench; original pewter oil bottle stamped on bottom "JAMES DIXON / & SONS / SHEFFIELD / 202 P"; original Joyce cap box w/caps; original canister of "TRANTER'S / PATENT / LUBRICATION COMPOSITION" with much original lube inside; 12 original bullets covered with white lead oxide. Case in good solid condition with two pivoting locking hooks, but missing brass lid escutcheon and lock bezel.      Reduced to $3,500  
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1740) Walker's "Excelsior" IV Ship's Log. Cased in original wood box, the log consists of an 11" long 4-bladed brass rotor (partly painted black) designed to be streamed behind the "Yacht, Motor Launch, or Fishing Craft" from an outrigger, the line attached to a gimbaled brass dial recorder fitted with a red painted iron flywheel. It appears to be in operating order, and the dial face is clean and shows no corrosion or fading. The set includes an oil can with label "Ship-Log Oil". All original and complete.    $150  
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1745) French Model 1836 Senior Gendarmerie Officer's Pistol. 5", .60 cal. damascus stripe barrel polygroove rifled "en chevaux" (hair rifling). Lock engraved "MANUFre de / CHATELLERAULT / C.T.& Cie"; in ex.crisp working order. Solid uncleaned stock, no cracks or repairs, iron mounts, hinged trapdoor in butt, checkered grip in fine condition. Original ramrod. VG+ overall, untouched. The flared checkered grip, the more elaborate fore end tip and the damascus barrel mark it as made for a senior officer.    $850  
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1771) American Arms Co. Double Barrel O/U Deringer. 3" barrels, one .32 RF the other .22 RF. Barrels rotated by hand, pulled forward to eject shells. Top of .32 barrel marked "WHEELER'S PAT. OCT. 31 1865", the .22 barrel "AMERICAN ARMS Co. BOSTON, MASS.". Barrels retain 35% original blue, balance fading to smooth plum. Bores have strong, bright rifling with some scattered light pitting. Action is crisp and positive, barrel lock-up tight, brass frame # 603 retains 10% or so original nickel. Grips are fine+, retain 95% smooth original varnish, some slight dings on bottom edges. VG+ overall.      Reduced to $700  
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1787) Webley R.I.C. Revolver Sold to New South Wales Police. 2 1/2", .450 cal. barrel with small Birmingham proofs, correct german silver foresight. 6-shot cylinder with Birmingham proofs, number "829" matching frame # 70829. Frame marked ".450 / 1761 / WEBLEY'S over manacled hands MP / N.S.W. POLICE" (1761 is the police inventory #; the manacled hands marked only on guns sold to police departments). Right side serial # 70829 and a small Birmingham proof. Top strap "P.WEBLEY & SON / LONDON & BIRMINGHAM". Action ex. tight working order and indexing, bore fine+ to ex., bright with sharp rifling. Grip checkering is fine+, only slight wear, no cracks or repairs, bears "NSW" stamp. Overall retains 50% original blue, balance smooth plum patina, never cleaned.    $1,600  
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1788) Cased Webley .450 R.I.C. Revolver, Webley's No.1, New Model of 1883, Retailed by Cogswell & Harrison. 4 1/2" barrel with Birmingham proofs. 6-shot cylinder 1 1/2" in length, bears Birmingham proofs, serial #995 as well as #5 which also appears on cylinder pin. Frame serial # 995, Birmingham proof, top strap engraved "COGSWELL & HARRISON / 226 STRAND, LONDON". Action and bore like new - mint. Grip like new. 99% original nickel finish, no wear to edges except for a little bit at rear of frame above grip, very minor and scarcely noticeable, one or two tiny areas of very light freckling, not wear. Screw heads like new. No flash wear at chamber/bore forcing cone interface. Overall condition is ex.++ , and many dealers would call it "virtually mint" , which it really is. Ex. all-original case retains both keys, original cleaning rod, pewter oil bottle, and screwdriver stamped "W.EVANS / PALL MALL". Original Cogswell & Harrison trade label, all fine original green baize lining, worn only where contacted by foresight. In "The Webley Story", Dowell illustrates this exact type, also nickel plated, pl.34e. On p.66, he details how these were made to handle .476, .455, and .450 ammunition. He also states that the long cylinder allowed it to be bored to use .45 Long Colt and .44-40 cartridges, though this cylinder's chambers have a well-defined step where they abruptly choke down and will allow only the above named English rounds with their shorter cases to enter. I tried a .45 LC round, it entered for about 2/3 its length and stopped dead at the step. However, it's evident that the cylinder is long enough to handle the American cartridges if properly bored. I mention this only to show Webley's interest in the American market; I most certainly am not suggesting that this revolver be desecrated by boring out the chambers! Note that the lack of Webley's name on the gun is nothing unusual. If requested, especially if by a highly respected firm such as Cogswell & Harrison, Webley would leave name and logo off so the retailer could apply his own. This was a very common custom in the English gun trade. However, in 1889, Webley refused to follow it any more, having learned that some unscrupulous dealers were buying Belgian copies and passing them off as Webleys, and that some had failed their owners. From that date, all Webley production would bear both name and logo. There is no doubt this is a a Webley - its glassy smooth action, precision and obvious quality are unmistakeable. As if Cogswell & Harrison would risk their reputation by trying to pass off a Belgian imposter!     Reduced to $4,250    
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1789) Cased Adams Mk.II Revolver. 4 1/4" octagonal barrel, .450 Boxer cal., marked on top flat "ADAM'S PATENT SMALL ARMS Co, 391, STRAND, LONDON." London view and proof marks. 6-shot cylinder with serial # 2484 (matching frame), London proofs. Frame marked "ADAM'S PATENT No 2484" with Adam's "TRADE MARK". Perfect, like new working order and indexing, chambers and bore mint, bright sharp rifling. Grip like new, shows no wear. Gun in ex.+ condition, retains 95%+ brilliant unworn original blue, just minor dulling / flaking on outside of trigger guard and on short upper grip tang. Case in ex. condition, original tools include screwdriver, brass cleaning rod, round wood box with screw-off lid (for spare screws?), all original green baize lining shows virtually no wear, original large Adam's trade label with instructions for use intact with minor staining from oily gun but entirely legible. Case lid has inset brass medallion engraved with owner's name "EDMUND RANDOLPH Esq. 69th REG't" .     Reduced to $4,250    
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1799) Danish Model 1789 "Rytterpallask" Heavy Cavalry Sword. 36 3/4" blade with broad central fuller, narrow fuller along back, small punch-mark at forte; VG+ condition, smooth dark age patina with small areas of light pitting. Heavy, large guard of brass with nice age patina, thumb ring and large globular pommel, all original leather grip covering with twisted brass wire wrap in fine condition. Left inside guard with punch-dot unit marking "9.5."   $1,450  
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1809) Canadian Issue Colt London Navy Revolver. 7 1/2", .36 cal. barrel with London proofs, marked "ADDRESS. COL. COLT. LONDON." Frame marked "COLT'S PATENT". Cylinder retains ex. full scene, including tiny edge marking "ENGAGED 16 MAY 1843" , and the equally tiny and shallow Ormsby signature (thinning but there) under "COLT'S PATENT No. 33236", London proofs, ex. nipples, cylinder pins show some wear but still function as designed to lock up the cylinder. Ex. grips retain 95%+ original varnish, sharp edges show almost no wear; no cracks, chips or repair; stamped "UC / G / 17" , and with a deep clear crown inspector's stamp on right grip near frame (the position where all 800 of the purchase were stamped). All serial numbers matching # 33236 - barrel, wedge ("236"), frame, trigger guard, backstrap, loading lever, and cylinder. Barrel retains 45% original bright blue, balance thinning but will still reflect the original high polish - never touched up or cleaned in any way - the lower 3 flats especially retain most original blue. Loading lever, hammer, and frame retain much original case color. Traces of original blue on t.g. and backstrap. All metal edges are sharp and crisp. All screw heads are perfect, unbuggered; it is likely the gun was never apart. Action, indexing, work fine, though I suspect the tip of the trigger sear is chipped slightly so as to shorten it a bit since the hammer rests a little further forward than usual in the loading notch and full cock. However, the action still performs all its functions properly. No. 33236 was issued to the Napanee ("G") Troop of Upper Canada. Its serial number lies between #'s 33233 and 33237 as recorded in a 1989 article in the Journal of Arms Collecting, Vol.27, No.1, listing known surviving Canadian Navy Colts. The list made no pretence to be complete - indeed I have over the years owned 5 other UC or LC Colts not on the list, along with some that were. The holster is a genuine 1856 purchase item, stamped where it should be with the Napanee issue markings "UC / G / 19" (close, but no cigar!) inside the flap with the same dies as used on the pistol grips. It is in generally good condition, missing the leather plug at the muzzle. The original strap and brass stud closure (you can see the stitching pattern) has been replaced during its working life by a small buckle (missing) and leather tongue. The original sewn-on belt loop (its stitched pattern also still visible) was replaced with a riveted leather and brass loop. These Colts and their accoutrements were in service for a long time; when the 1885 Rebellion broke out, they were still the principal revolver available. A large order for Colt 1878 revolvers was hastily placed! A completely correct and honest untouched revolver.      Reduced to $6,250    
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1810) U.S. Model 1861 Rifle-Musket. 40", .58 cal. barrel marked with "V", "P" and eaglehead, dated 1862. Bore is in ex.+ condition, bright with sharp rifling. Lock markings "US / NORWICH", Eagle, date "1863". Note that a one year difference between lock and barrel dates is a frequent occurrence on both private contractor and Springfield Arsenal guns and is considered of no consequence when the condition of components matches (as they do here).Lock is in ex. working order, hammer nose is slightly chipped. Solid stock, no cracks or repairs, just a very few minor dings, has been cleaned and refinished, though in an attractive manner. Two inspectors' cartouches are still visible though faint, plus the large oval cartouche of James D.Mowry, a major partner in the Norwich firm. With its ex.+ to near mint bore, this would make a fine shooter. All metal is clean, no pitting, deep clear markings. Original rammer and sling swivels.     Reduced to $950  
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1820) Hagner #2 45-70 Leather Cartridge Pouch. Cover flap embossed "US" ; marked "No.2" on back; closing tab has tiny inspector's initials on tip. Pouch contains 3 rows of canvas loops, 8 loops to a row. All seam stitching and canvas loops are sound and intact, fine condition. Leather is fine also. This pouch design developed by Col.P.V.Hagner, Commanding Officer of Watervliet Arsenal.    $175  
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1821) Montenegrin Revolver c.1885-90. 3 3/4" barrel with integral foresight, marked "VERO MONTENEGRINO". 5-shot cylinder stamped #52, matching #52 on frame. Belgian proof for rifled arms. Chambered for the large (by handgun standards) Austrian Werndl Cavalry Carbine round, as was the original Gasser Montenegrin revolver of 1870, also issued to the Austrian military. Ex. crisp working and indexing order, double or single action. Lightly engraved overall; retains 90% original nickel plate. Hammer, trigger, and ejector mechanism retain good traces of original blue. Grips retain fine checkering, no chips, cracks or repairs. Bore has strong rifling, dark in the grooves.    $700  
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1825) Caucasian / Russian Cossack Shashka, circa 1850-75. 30" multi-fullered blade of distinctive shashka form, probably of Solingen origin. I have seen this exact pattern of etching once before on a shashka blade ,attributed to Solingen
Generally speaking, Caucasian warriors preferred blades from Europe; Persian "poulad jauharder" damascus (Russian: "bulat") was considered too brittle. Solingen wisely paid very close attention to their agents and merchants from areas all over the world, and produced blades of quality in configurations calculated to appeal to local markets. Hilt and scabbard mounts of matching relief carved silver niello, with gold wash highlights. Scabbard of wood, leather covered in traditional ass skin, seam stitching intact, some small surface scratches but in fine condition with no repairs. Blade has some small areas of light pitting, shows age and wear but has been maintained over the years - no edge nicks and very sharp. A good shashka, with fine quality hilt and scabbard mounts.
     Reduced to $3,000    
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1847) Fine English Blunderbuss by Durs Egg, c.1775-85, property of General Thomas Graham, Laird of Balgowan, later Lord Lynedoch. 15 1/2" brass barrel, 1 1/4" bore at muzzle, narrowing down to approx. .75 - .80 cal., octagonal at breech, London view and proof marks, engraved "D. EGG - LONDON" , fitted with 14" spring bayonet. When I obtained this blunderbuss the bayonet was inclined not to lock in deployed position, but all it needed was some oil on the catch: it now works exactly as Egg intended it should. Lock engraved "D. EGG", fitted with bolted safety and roller frizzen spring, of highest quality (extremely crisp and smooth) and in like-new working order. Bolted safeties date from the mid-18th century or earlier, and a dueling pistol by Egg dated to 1775-80 has a roller frizzen spring ( Clay P. Bedford "Early Firearms of Great Britain and Ireland from the Collection of Clay P.Bedford" Metropolitan Museum of Art, # 74, p.81-84). Original top-jaw and screw, and most likely the last flint put in it during its working life. Solid stock, crisp checkered wrist, small repair obverse muzzle, short crack at reverse muzzle (see pics). All-brass furniture engraved with martial motifs. Rammer is original, last 1 -2" broken off, but this slight damage is, of course, invisible when rammer is in stock. Overall condition is Fine +. Durs Egg was one of the most celebrated gunsmiths of London in the later 18th and early 19th centuries. Born in Switzerland in 1745, trained there and apparently in France, he came to London in 1772. He obtained the Royal Warrant of the Prince Regent, later George IV. The oval brass sideplate cum lockscrew washer is engraved with the motto of the Grahams of Balgowan "CANDIDE ET SECURE", as well as their hawk and below that Thomas Graham's initials "T.G.". See pic from heraldry website and compare with sideplate engraving; they are identical. The motto could be translated as "straightforward and trustworthy". And this Thomas Graham of Balgowan proved to be, though justifiably a motto "relentless and vengeful" might have served just as well, as we will see.

Graham did not initially choose a military career. Inheriting the estates of Balgowan, in Perthshire, Scotland, the new Laird set about employing and teaching the most progressive agricultural and animal husbandry methods, benefiting both his own returns and those of his tenants. His reputation became that of a successful and fair landlord. He stood for election, and became the Member of Parliament for Perthshire. It is known that he was inclined to view the events of 1789 Revolutionary France with cautious understanding. As an MP, he was obliged to maintain a fine residence in London, and this is where his wife, Mary Cathcart, daughter of Lord Cathcart, (sister of the Duchess of Atholl and the Countess of Mansfield, both married to Murrays), and much beloved by her husband, enters the picture for our purposes.

Lady Graham soon became one of the leading beauties (in fact, probably the reigning one) of London society in the later 1780's. Gainsborough, the preeminent portraitist of his era, portrayed her in the famous "The Beautiful Mrs. Graham", a painting which survives to this day, and which leaves no doubt as to her striking and elegant appearance (see pic). On one occasion during Graham's time in London, he was stopped by three footpads on his way to a court function (a party, by other accounts) in his coach while accompanied by his wife and another noblewoman. Two of the thieves held the horses whilst the third attempted to rob the occupants of the coach. Graham drew his smallsword, leapt across the ladies and flung the miscreant to the pavement with the sword at his throat. This ended the encounter when the other two let loose the horses upon the threat to their accomplice. It seems likely that Graham did not have access to a firearm, and it may have been this event that occasioned his purchase of the blunderbuss, which is of a size best described as "coaching" rather than the smaller home defense type. On a more serious note, and at some time after this event ( but obviously not connected), Mrs. Graham fell prey to a serious respiratory illness (probably tuberculosis), and her doctor advised her husband to take her to a southern Mediterranean climate. He immediately did so, but sadly she died off the south coast of France in 1792, while aboard ship. Graham was taking her home overland when Revolutionary French officials (troops, in other accounts), insisted in breaking open and searching her coffin. It was a sacrilegious violation that completely altered the Laird of Balgowan's life. Enraged with an implacable hatred of the French, he returned to Scotland, buried his wife, and raised at his own expense the 90th Foot ("The Perthshire Grey Breeks"), which he took to Portugal as its Colonel. Evidencing considerable military talent, Graham was unable to obtain deserved promotion by the Duke of York's regulations. Nevertheless, at the dying wish of Sir John Moore, he was raised to the rank of Major General.

General Graham returned with Wellington to the Peninsula; his career there is recorded in many histories. I will cite one event, the Battle of Barossa, 5 March 1811, to give an example of the service he was capable of rendering. Sent with 5200 British and Portuguese troops to assist the Spanish in raising the French siege of Cadiz, General Graham agreed to participate in a Spanish attempt to attack the besieging French from the rear. The Spanish contributed 9600 troops under General La Pena, who received overall command of the venture because he command the majority. It was not an ill-conceived plan, but everything depended upon a swift circling movement before the French could prepare an adequate response and La Pena wasn't up to it. The advance of the combined force was slow, hesitant, and the French mustered 7000 troops under Marshal Victor to move out and defeat the allies. Learning of the French approach, Graham decided to hold his 5200 men in an advantageous position on Barossa Ridge to receive them, but La Pena ordered him to march on. Graham obeyed, but wisely left a battalion and some cavalry under Major Brown to hold the ridge. Unlike La Pena, Marshal Victor also saw the importance of the ridge, and attacked with two divisions which forced Brown to retreat and warn Graham, who promptly turned about and retook the ridge, beating off two French downhill counterattacks in the process. Victor now sent four French columns under Laval. At a range of fifty yards, British and Portuguese volleys from a line two deep forced the French to retreat, with the cavalry of the Kings German Legion finishing the business. The day was won - but incredibly without help of any sort from the Spanish who simply looked on (in fairness, there were Spanish officers who saw the wonderful opportunity to use their numerous cavalry to attack the retreating French and begged to do so - but La Pena refused). The siege of Cadiz was not lifted. It was at Barossa that the first French Eagle to be taken in battle by the British was captured by Sergeant Patrick Masterson of the 89th Foot, whose regimental slogan was "Faught a Ballagh" ( Gaelic: "Clear the Way"). For this, Masterson received a lieutenancy and the 89th the title "The Prince of Wales Own Irish Regiment", plus the right to place an eagle on their colours. Disgusted, Graham refused the Spanish offer of Grandee of the First Class, and returned to the main army in Portugal. He subsequently became Wellington's second in command. It remains an unanswerable question whether General Graham kept his blunderbuss in his coach on campaign. Certainly all such senior officers had a coach - a place for maps, correspondence, orders and copies of orders sent, spare and full dress uniforms, etc.,and small arms. At the very least, they would have a pair of pistols for the saddle holsters of the horse they rode in battle, and many were known to keep entire garnitures of firearms. It wasn't only Royal Mail coaches that were armed with blunderbusses, indeed in 18th and early 19th century England, the words "coach" and "blunderbuss" naturally go together. And did Graham remember his own coaching encounter of years gone by?
   $7,500  
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1854) Spanish Bilbo Hilted Cavalry Broadsword c.1750. 33 1/2 blade of flattened lenticular section, engraved/etched for 11" at forte with well-executed leaf and vine design; 10" fullers both sides with letters "HACOM" , possibly the bladesmith's name or the initials of an invocation. Bi-lobe hilt secured in the traditional style by 4 screws. It is a no-nonsense functional guard, but there is nothing crude about it - it is graceful and practical without needing embelishment. The original grip is of wood with the usual four iron straps. Note that it was apparently never wire wrapped as it is next to impossible to press tightly wound twisted wire down with these four straps, and yet leave no impression in the grip's surface. Fine condition overall, no repairs, damage or restoration. This is the sword of a cavalry officer, or perhaps a gentleman of militia in New Spain, Mexico, California, etc.   $2,500  
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1859) Spanish Miquelet Pistol with "Catalan" Style Stock c. 1750-80. 10 3/4", .64 cal. ribbed octagonal to round barrel. Lock of traditional Spanish miquelet type, in good working order with powerful mainspring. Solid stock, no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, fitted with belt hook, fine steel inlay of a style popular in Ripoll as early as the mid-17th century. The two holes seen above and below the pointed tail of the lock were formed by the nails used to secure the usual leather/cloth pad to protect the trigger finger from the tip of the mainspring bearing on the heel of the cock. This pad is almost always long since missing on miquelets. Original wood ramrod with turned steel tip. In W. Keith Neal's "Spanish Guns and Pistols", pl.58, is illustrated a very similar pistol dated 1780, same form of stock (no inlay, however), same type barrel band secured by band spring. Neal also shows (pl.15) a Portuguese wheel-lock pistol (c. 1650) with this same sort of grip - apparently, this unique form developed early on the Iberian Peninsula, and has no special connection with Catalonia. I have used the term "Catalan" since this grip form does strongly resemble the so-called Catalan stock found on Spanish longarms, and immediately brings to mind the distinctive down-curving form. See also a "Ripoll Blunderbuss Pistol" (c.1750), plates 103-4, "Spanish Military Weapons in Colonial America 1700-1821" by Brinckerhoff & Chamberlain. The authors call its stock "Spanish/Catalan". A good and all-original early Spanish pistol in VG+ condition with smooth clean metal overall.    $3,600    
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1860) Cased Pair of German Target or Duelling Pistols 1853-60. 9 1/2", .41 cal. fluted octagonal barrels, numbered 1 and 2 in gold inlay, one marked "PETER SCHENK", the other "IN MARIENBAD" also gold inlay. Hook breeches, standing breeches numbered 1 and 2 in gold inlay. Bores are bright mint, deeply rifled. Engraved locks marked in gold inlay with "PETER SCHENK" and "IN MARIENBAD" respectively. Locks in perfect working order. Excellent+, like new, stocks with sharp edges and crisp carving, silver barrel key escutcheons, oval silver escutcheon with initials of owner, engraved iron mounts retain all fine original blue.

Barrels and locks also retain all fine original blue. Overall the guns are in all respects like new, showing no wear. The quality of the engraving and stock carving is of the best, both looking as if they were done yesterday. Case retains all original lining in fine condition, maker's name on lid liner. Accessories include a mold, made with the same attention to precision as the guns; nipple wrench that doubles as a screwdriver with two blades; a spoon-like powder scoop; a silver and horn powder flask (missing spout); a horn-headed mallet / loading rod and a cleaning rod with horn knob. The case is sound, with many german silver inlays, though all the 1/2" wide, thin right angled edge straps are missing. They were not structural, decorative only for the case is still solid. These straps would not be hard to replace, they were merely glued on. Fortunately, the much more difficult to duplicate corner mounts remain, as do the lock escutcheon and lid plate.
   $12,500  
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1863) Fine Engraved Tranter Model 1868 Retailed by E.M. Reilly, London. 3" octagonal barrel marked ".450" (caliber), Birmingham proofs, and on top flat "E.M.Reilly & Co / 502 Oxford St London". 5-shot cylinder with Birmingham proofs and assembly # "71". Engraved frame marked "Tranters Patent" , serial # 40763. Loading gate with assembly # "71". Smooth, perfect action and indexing, like new. Bore is VG+, bright with only isolated areas of minor pitting. Checkered grip is ex.+, never cleaned, no dings, cracks or repairs, sharp checkering.

Overall, gun retains 90% fine nickel; thin but smooth dulled finish on bottom outside of trigger guard and buttcap- but their engraving is still sharp. See Black, Guerin, and Michaud "Tranter Cartridge Firearms" , pp. 114-5 for an identical model with same "late type" ejector. An excellent, all-original revolver.   $2,400  

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1864) Cased English Colt 1860 Army with London proofs and Steel Trigger Guard. 8", .44 cal barrel with address "ADDRESS COL.SAML COLT NEW YORK US AMERICA", London proofs. There is also a 2 1/2" professionally engraved Sanskrit (not Arabic) inscription on reverse side, indicating ownership by an Indian potentate or perhaps it is an inventory inscription of a noble's armoury. Cylinder bears London proofs. Blued steel trigger guard for sale at London depot. All matching serial # 154443 / L: barrel, wedge, trigger guard, backstrap, cylinder, cylinder arbor, frame.The "L" (for London) appears with full serial #'s on the barrel, frame, trigger guard, and backstrap. The wedge, cylinder and cylinder arbor are numbered 4443. The barrel retains 55-60% original fine blue, balance is smooth honest wear. Cylinder has some blue on rebated section, scene is complete with light wear. Hammer and frame (marked "COLTS / PATENT) retain much original case color; t.g. and backstrap about 10% original blue. The grip is solid with no cracks or repairs, retains 90%+ original varnish, has small chip at obverse toe. Action in fine working order and indexing; bore VG with strong rifling, clean with scattered light pitting. The small wedge spring is broken off and missing. The revolver has never been fooled with or cleaned. It is entirely original.

The case is in fine condition, partitioned in the London manner and retaining its original baize lining in ex. condition. It contains the original screwdriver / nipple wrench and the mold marked "COLTS PATENT" ; both tools retain most original blue, the mold with surface freckling from use. There is a packet of cartridges "FOR COLT'S ARMY PISTOL"; a typical English bag flask as found in most cased London Colts, just 2-3 very small dings, marked "JAMES DIXON / & SONS / SHEFFIELD"; a lacquered tin cap box with original label (faded but legible): "CHARLES NEPHEW & Co. / GUNSMITHS / OLD COURT HOUSE STREET / TANK SQUARE / CALCUTTA".("Tank" = large cistern or reservoir, a common feature of Indian civic architecture). Several conical bullets cast in the mold remain.
A fine, all-original cased English Colt.
   $6,000    

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1865) An Excellent Prussian Zundladelbuchse Modell 1865 Jaeger Rifle. 30" octagonal barrel, 15.43mm, turned round at muzzle for bayonet ring, lug on side flat, original foresight with brass backing for increased visibility, dovetailed block rear sight with four folding leaves (stamped with matching # 1361 to gun); marked "STAHL" over chamber, stamped with numerous proofing and inspectors' marks, serial # "1361". Receiver with many inspectors' marks, #"1361", Prussian eagle over "SPANDAU", "BB MOD 65", matching # 1361 on bolt body and cocking piece, bolt handle "61" (Dreyse bolt handles are separate pieces threaded into bolt body), receiver dated "1868 / 1869". Bolt retains needle. Action in perfect working order, as are the double set triggers. Bore is mint. Bolt retains original "in the white" polish. Barrel has sharp-edged flats, retains 95% original brown, as does the receiver. Original sling swivels. Stock is solid, never cleaned or re-finished, no cracks or repairs, shows little wear at all - just very minor handling marks, stamped on obverse butt with usual Prussian ownership marks (and an inventory # 1244 of some museum or institution), crown over "S" behind tail of trigger guard. Buttplate, screwheads everywhere, stamped "61". Matching "61" original ramrod with inspectors' stamps, knob head and cleaning jag end. This gun has not been given the Beck Transformation modification. A period paper label is stuck on the reverse buttstock. It bears very faded inked writing - too faded for me to read - only the large "65" at the end of the inscription can be made out. I would imagine that whatever institution stamped the obverse with 1444 put on this label. But to their credit they preserved the gun in ex. all-matching condition.   $5,200    
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1866) Cased Colt Pocket Model of 1849. 4", .31 cal. barrel marked "ADDRESS COL SAML COLT NEW=YORK USA AMERICA", serial # 298207. 5-shot cylinder with stagecoach scene and "COLTS PATENT 8207". Frame stamped "COLTS / PATENT", Trigger guard "31 CAL". All numbers are matching - barrel, wedge, frame, cylinder, cylinder arbor, trigger guard, backstrap. There is no loading lever #, and this is correct for this era. # 298207 was made in 1865, which started at 295001 and finished at 310000. Action is perfect, like new. Safety pins all intact, nipples like new with all blue intact. Bore is mint, and cylinder chambers retain original blue inside. Cylinder scene is perfect. Gun retains 99.5%+ original brilliant blue, no fading or drifting to plum at all. Loading lever, frame and hammer retain 100% original case colors.Grips are ex,+, near mint with only 1 or 2 tiny dings, next to no edge wear at all, retain all original varnish. The back-strap and trigger guard retain only a small amount of silver plating, and this is typical of late Colt percussion guns - the plating was much thinner than earlier production. This is a known fact of Colt collecting, with some experts recalling guns with mint blue (like this one), but with virtually no silver plating left. One dealer put it well when he speaks of the plating on these late Colts as being "...only a few atoms thick".
Case is in fine condition, no damage. Original blue baize lining in ex. condition, contains brass .31 cal mold marked "COLTS PATENT", casting round and conical bullets, fine condition showing little use; Flask is in fine condition with but 2-3 tiny dents, American eagle with shield and banner "PLURIBUS UNUM" (no "E"). Interestingly, there is an old stamp on the bottom of the case "NEW YORK CITY POST / TWO CENTS".
   $8,500  
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1867) A Very Rare Spanish Brass Mounted Model 1767 Dragoon Sword. 36 3/4" (measured from guard, 38" if measured from cross-guard) double-edged blade stamped on obverse "CLOSAS" and on reverse with Arrow Mark of the Barcelona Cutlers and "Crowned R" of Royal Ownership. (Magi Closas, Barcelona, 17601780, a known maker of this pattern). Heavy brass hilt of regulation pattern with leather covered wood grip, about 50% of this original leather remains though only a short piece of the original twisted brass wire wrap remains at the grip-collar junction. Smooth blade with deep clear markings, no damage to hilt, a fine original in all respects sword, completely undisturbed. See Brinckerhoff & Chamberlain, "Spanish Military Weapons in Colonial America 17001821", plates 164-65 for exact type; see also Brinckerhoff p.80 for reference to brass hilted dragoon swords in Havana inventory of 1771. Brinckerhoff thought that the example he illustrates (from the Army Museum, Madrid) was the only known specimen. In fact, several others have survived, and are discussed and illustrated on line by Juan L. Calvo (May, 2006). These swords are a type first proposed and drawn by Garcia Ramirez de Arellano in 1767, and put into production for Dragoons shortly thereafter. The pattern equipped Spanish Dragoons during much of the reign of Carlos III (1759-88). The hilt type is known in Spanish as "barquilla con vela en laton" (boat with candle in brass) - in English such a guard is often referred to as "boatshell". Arellano wrote that the brass hilt would be as durable as the traditional iron/steel guards previously used by Spanish Dragoons (and that would be again in the last years of the 18th century), but as Juan Calvo puts it "...the rare presence in museums and collections..." of this type seems to prove Arellano wrong. In fairness, this pattern is at least every bit as sturdy as many French, Prussian and other European troopers' brass cavalry hilts, though these comparatively wealthier states may have tolerated a higher rate of damage attrition than Spain could. Aside from loss through damage, Calvo points out that these hilts could be melted down for other armaments - we do know the blades were re-used on later, steel-hilted swords. Stretched to the limit and beyond by a far-flung empire, Spain had to resort to such measures. When one considers the attrition of the Napoleonic and Carlist Wars, the extreme rarity of what was never a common sword becomes understandable.   $4,250  
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1868) Magazine for Remington 1882/85 Rifle, cal.45-70. Marked "REMINGTON" with patent dates. Ex. condition with 90% original dark finish. Complete, no dents.    $75  
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1870) British "OFFICIAL COPY / FIELD SERVICE REGULATIONS". Covers all conceivable operations and situations from A to Z. "THIS MANUAL IS ISSUED BY COMMAND OF THE ARMY COUNCIL / WAR OFFICE / 10th NOVEMBER, 1914" 302 pages. Original, not a reprint, in good condition.    $50  
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1873) Napoleonic French Hussar or Light Infantry Officer's saber in the Hussar style. 28 1/2" blade with clip point, signed at forte with maker's initials, but difficult to read under langet, etched with trophy of arms, half moon etc., surface is smooth with scattered light pitting in places and patina. Brass mounted hilt and scabbard; hilt in fine condition except for some loss to the original wire wrap. Leather grip covering in 100% complete and fine condition. The ridged motif on the langets is duplicated on the knuckle bow. Scabbard in fine condition, virtually no dents or damage to mounts, original leather with intact seam. Circa 1800-05.    $1,400    
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1874) Tooled Leather Rifle Case c. 1880. In good condition, retaining its original shoulder strap. It appears to have been professionally lengthened 9", certainly during its period of use. I've had it for years - it could accept standard 1873 Winchester with full mag and 24" barrel (tight, but the gun went in and the flap closed). I don't guarantee such a fit today, for leather can age and shrink, but it gives an idea of the size of gun it was made for. 46" overall. It would look great hanging beside an appropriate period rifle.    $75  
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1875) Bavarian Wall Gun (Wallbuchse) Model 1824/60. 36" heavy swamped octagonal barrel, stamped with Amberg Arsenal marks at breech, approx. 90 cal. rifled with 7 deep grooves, fitted with second type rear sight to take advantage of the much increased range of the Podewils-Minie bullet that came into use in 1860. Lock marked "AMBERG"; both it and the double-set triggers are in ex. working order. Bore is a bit dark, but rifling is deep and clear. Weight approx. 30 lbs. Smooth even patina on all metal, all markings strong and clear. Fine solid stock, no repairs or cracks. Complete and in fine condition; an interesting gun.   $3,500    
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1876) Emancipation Proclamation, executed by artist Gilman R.Russell, "Prof. of Penmanship". "Published by Act of Congress in the year 1865" and also printed by "D.S.Duoal & Son, Phila". Original gilt frame 27 X 20 1/2", original wood backing. I bought this from a Canadian antique dealer over 25 years ago. The original glass was cracked from side to side in the middle, and I had it replaced by correct thin glass. The crack in the glass did not in any way affect the print itself or leave any trace. Everything else is original to 1865. The print is in fine condition with only very light discoloring in two small unimportant areas, no tears or damage, repairs, restoration, or missing paper. It is in far better original condition than ones I have seen offered on line costing more than I ask at    $1,200  
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1880) A Nice Quality Overcoat Pistol by Patrick, Liverpool. 5", .53 cal. oct. barrel, engraved "LIVERPOOL" and with platinum line at breech, upper flat engraved "MAKER TO THE DUKE OF GLOUCESTER". Engraved lockplate with maker "PATRICK", bolted safety. Ex. crisp working order. Fine+ solid stock, no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, fine checkering on bag grip, engraved iron mounts, silver barrel key and wrist escutcheons. Wrist escutcheon depicts a long horned animal (goat?) neck and head atop a coronet. This pistol is a very well done conversion to percussion, performed by an accomplished gunsmith/engraver, that does justice to the pistol's quality. Edward Patrick of Liverpool is variously listed as c. 1780-1830 or 1805-30. He is the only Patrick noted as the maker to the Duke of Gloucester. His widow, Ann, carried on the business to 1832.   $1,100  
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1884) Large British Swivel Blunderbuss (Espingole), Early 19th Century. 24" heavy brass barrel, 12 bore expanding to 2" at muzzle (outer bell muzzle 3"); stamped with Birmingham proofs and "12". Weight of gun is 24 1/2 lbs, intended for heavy charges. Lock marked "COOPER / LONDON". Entry in M.Carey "English, Irish and Scottish Firearms Makers", P.20, "Cooper (about 1790) Shop in London. Made brass barrel, bell muzzle, flintlock swivel boat gun". Although Stockel lists many Coopers, only one had a shop in London, and in the right era: "Cooper, Hugh, London GB, erw 1801". With these two entries, I think we've found our man. Lock in ex. working order. Fine solid stock, no cracks or repairs, never refinished, brass furniture with flat Sea Service type buttplate. Original ramrod. Swivel fitted with retaining key, the significance of which is best explained by William Gilkerson in "Boarders Away II", p.103, in his discussion of espingoles. Also on this page is an illustration of a swivel blunderbuss virtually identical to this one, including the retaining key on swivel. I will quote verbatim from Gilkerson's chapter "Little Artillery", since he does a better job of explaining the retaining key's purpose than I could: "All were used like the swivel cannons and similarly stationed, although an espingole's swivel did not need a heavy stanchion or bitt as a mounting; an unreinforced cap rail was sufficiently strong to absorb the lighter gun's recoil. Hence, espingoles could easily be employed at stations where heavier guns could not be used, in fact anywhere along the rails or bulkheads. Aloft, they did not need the heavy curb required for a cannon or howitzer; the espingole's swivel pinion could socket directly into the squaring staff - the wooden spreader streching at a convenient swivel-height across the topmast shrouds. The shrouds were seized to the staff in order to prevent the deadeye-lanyards from twisting under tension, and the spring afforded by these ropes easily took up the light gun's recoil. Perhaps in anticipation of use on this station, some espingole swivel pinions were slotted and keyed at their bottoms to keep them from leaping out of their socket with the recoil's back-whip from the cordage. No restraining system was needed for pinions socketed in a fixed timber or rail". Included with the gun is a fine wood mounting. The strap around the butt is necessary because the gun is muzzle heavy on the swivel. A fine example and completely original in all respects, untouched, with a smooth deep patina on the brass barrel.    $6,000  
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1885) A Rare 17th/18th Century Venetian Naval Cutlass. 28 1/2" stiff, double-edged blade, stamped with armourer's mark both sides (resembles a pair of X's). Light pitting on upper half, light to moderate medium pitting towards tip. Large iron semi-bowl guard of characteristic form with long quillon and knuckle bow secured to the shiavona-like pommel by wire (a method used on many shiavonas). The circular stamp on the upper bowl is almost certainly the remains of the typical Lion of St. Mark stamp seen on many earlier shiavonas. Wood grip retains original leather in good condition.
The picture of this pattern cutlass and the catalog entry in Italian comes from "L'Armeria Castello Di Moncelice", 1980. The catalog reads under the heading "Venice 17th Century"; "Two Naval Boarding Swords". This is the first of these distinctive swords I have owned, or even seen outside a book.
   $1,500  
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1886) A Scarce Early English Naval Cutlass c. 1690 - 1700. 29", curved single fuller blade marked both sides with running wolf (or fox), and anchor. According to the literature, these marks are often found on these swords. Brass hilt of same type found on wrecks dating to 1694 and 1703 (see W.Gilkerson, "Boarders Away", p.74, no.s 3 and 4). Fine condition overall, untouched tang peen, no damage or restoration. Completely original in all respects.    $1,800    
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1887) Cross Belt Plate of the Carmarthen Militia c.1803. 2 7/8 X 2 1/4", with Prince of Wales plumes, "39" and "ROYAL CAERMARTIN FUSEL". The Carmarthen Militia was raised in 1763, becoming "Royal" in 1799, and raised to Fuselier status in 1803. The regiment drew the number 39 in the 1803 ballot. Condition is untouched, deep age patina.    $390  
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1889) Sudanese Kaskara, Late 19th Century. 35" heavy double edged blade well-etched with Arabic (probably Koranic) inscriptions and two cartouches of typical Islamic style. Blade is generally smooth, especially in area of inscriptions, small scattered patches of light-medium pitting. Hilt entirely covered in sewn leather matching scabbard. Scabbard in fine condition, showing some wear, original shoulder strap. An unknown (to me) species of animal with fur and nasty claws was persuaded to donate some body parts to create the upper and middle mounts.
The inscriptions are executed with skill and precision. They are entirely legible and certainly not of the quickly scribbled for decorative effect variety. Though I make no pretense to read Arabic, I can on occasions discern a date, and on this blade very clearly appears the Muslim date of 1174 over the character "seneh" which often underlines a date. This equates to a dating from Aug.13, 1760 AD, to Aug.2, 1761 AD (the Muslim year is based upon the lunar year, not the solar year). That a kaskara would employ an earlier blade is not unusual - early blades were accorded great respect. VG+ condition overall.
   $475  
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1890) A Good Caucasian/Russian Kindjal with Silver Niello Mounts. 12 3/4" double edged substantial blade with characteristic off-set fullers in ex. smooth condition. Fine quality silver niello mounts in ex. condition, solid horn grips, scabbard leather in fine condition. A good late 19th century kindjal in nice condition.    $700    
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1891) Royal Navy Pattern 1804 Cutlass. 29" blade stamped "GR" with inspector's stamp Crown over 4, maker "BATE" stamped on back. Blade is smooth with light age patina. Original leather washer at blade/hilt junction. Hilt is smooth dark age patina retaining some original black paint. A fine example of the 1804 cutlass, no damage or restoration.    $1,350  
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1894) Training Model of U.S.S. Hamilton, 4-Stack 75-185 Class. Model constructed in 1942 by a Chief Petty Officer to train new recruits, 39" in length, of very fine detail and accuracy. Contained in its original plywood carrying case (44" long) with internal fixtures which firmly secure it and its delicate masts and wireless equipment. Solid wood hull. It should be remembered that many young Navy recruits came from places like Kansas, Nebraska, etc., and had never seen a ship in their in their lives (opportunities for tourism being somewhat restricted in the Great Depression), let alone a warship. Port, starboard? Why not just left or right? Bow, stern? Many words and concepts that most had never considered in their short lives, yet would now become a matter of life or death for them. But they were merely ignorant, not stupid, and would learn quickly. Such a model would be an excellent introduction. Preserved by the original carrying case, the model is in excellent original condition, with no damage, repairs or restoration. It is exactly the way it was in 1942.    $850  
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1896) Napoleonic French Epee de Cour (Court or Official's sword). 32" single edge blade etched with miltary trophies, floral designs, etc., typical of the period; maker "S&K" (Schnitzler & Kirschbaum, working 1811-65, Solingen, John Walter, "Sword and Bayonet Makers Imperial Germany", entry 150). Brass hilt of exact pattern with helmeted head pommel shown in D. Venner "Les Armes Blanches / Sabres et Epees", p.193, pl.24 (see pics). No damage or loss to hilt, original grip wire a bit loose but appears to be all there. Leather scabbard with two brass mounts, to be carried by baldric/shoulder strap only, two minor repairs to leather, seam stitching intact. Blade has smooth surface, markings fine and clear, age patina.   $375  
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1899) A Good Early 19th Century Balkan Miquelet Pistol with an Earlier Spanish Barrel. 12', .65 cal. barrel with deep Spanish punch-marks (more below). Balkan miquelet lock of fine quality in ex. working order with powerful springs, stamped with armourer's mark in Arabic. An unusual feature of this lock is the built-in provision of a shield to cover the heel of the cock on which the powerful mainspring bears, to protect the trigger finger. Stock is covered with engraved brass sheathing, "rat tail" of eastern low-grade silver, as are the barrel bands. In the list of genuine Spanish marks included in W.Keith Neal's "Spanish Guns and Pistols", pp.93-101, some nine barrelsmiths used the rampant lion combined with the stamp of a crown over the letters of the smith's name; it is a common format. Unfortunately, age and wear has obscured the letters in this instance, though they can be vaguely discerned. There is an air of age and re-use about this barrel. In considering its origin, I could note that Albanian and Turkish barrelsmiths out to deceive their clients generally employed a delightful mix of Cyrillic and Latin letters, not well-made European punch marks. But Italian barrel suppliers to the Balkans might, just as they often used famous barrelsmiths' names like Lazzarino Comminazzo (in various spellings - as would the native Balkan smiths). And furthermore, Isidoro Soler's "Historical Account of the Gunmakers of Madrid" (published in 1795) laments in chapter VII that counterfeiters in Spain whose "...greed for gain..." prompted them to fake the marks of famous barrel makers. So whether this barrel is the real thing from Spain, or a Spanish counterfeit, or an Italian barrel with well-made false Spanish marks - it would probably have passed for authentic in the Balkans, and been re-mounted once or more times (think "Andrea Farara"). A good example of the "Albanian" pistol, actually much carried throughout the Balkans.    $1,150  
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1900) British Second Model Pattern 1853 Rifle Musket. 39", .577 cal. barrel profusely marked (see pics) with Crowns, Broad Arrows, etc. Bore is VG+, sharp clear rifling with a few small patches of light pitting. Lock stamped Crown over "VR", "1856", "TOWER", lock inspector's stamp Crown over Broad Arrow, "P/19" (Pimlico Arsenal stamp). Lock is in crisp, like new working order. Ex., uncleaned stock, no cracks or repairs, nice untouched patina with sharp edges, deep clear Pimlico Arsenal rondel dated "1863", "2" (for Second Class), contractor's name "J.WARD" in counter-lock area, brass mounts with untouched dark "mustard" patina. Pimlico Arsenal was a re-furbishing depot for British military firearms. Original sling swivels and correct original swollen neck ramrod (not often seen). Metal is smooth blue turned dark plum overall, all markings deep and clear. A very nice, untouched, P.'53 Second Model, so many of which were sent to wear out and rust "East of Suez". Not this one.   $1,500  
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1903) A Fine Mortimer, London, Flintlock Pistol. 7 7/8" octagonal barrel, .60 cal., patent (hook) breech stamped in deep cartouche "MORTIMER / LONDON", two gold inlaid lines at breech, gold bushed touch hole, retains nearly all original damascus stripe. Lock engraved "MORTIMER", bolted safety, water-proof pan, roller on frizzen spring. Cock and frizzen engraved with same border design. Lock in ex. crisp working order. Ex. condition stock with checkered bag grip, engraved iron mounts, silver wrist escutcheon engraved with "R", silver barrel key mounts. Considering the size and caliber of the gun, and the provision of a swivel rammer, indicates this is probably a travelling or overcoat pistol ( one of a pair, of course), but possibly an infantry officer's gun - if they carried pistols, it was generally in their uniform's pockets. Excellent condition overall, a fine example by a justly famous London family.    $2,700  
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1904) Rare Russian Model 1752/1808 Pistol. 10 1/2" barrel, .67 cal., stamped with inspectors' marks and Imperial double-headed eagle. Lock marked "TULA" (in Cyrillic, of course), dated "1804". Fine working order. Brass mounted stock with raised carving along rammer channel, around barrel tang, lockplate and sideplate also; carved arrowheads appear on end of barrel tang and both ends of carving surrounding lockplate and sideplate. Wrist bears escutcheon with cypher of Czar Alexander I (1801-25). Stock shows wear and dings but nothing serious, VG condition, no repairs or restoration, never cleaned. Pistol is all original except old replacement ramrod.
The Model 1752 was almost an exact copy of the Prussian pistol illustrated and described in G. Neumann's "Battle Weapons of the American Revolution", pl.30PP, p.261, "circa 1727-31". Even the carved arrowheads are found on the Model 1752. Prussian arms would have a predominate influence on Russian military design until French patterns took over to some extent during and certainly after the Napoleonic Wars. The long-serving M.1752 had its barrel officially shortened from 14 3/4" to 10 1/2" in 1808, foreshadowing the M.1809's 10 1/2" barrel and creating the Model 1752/1808.A very scarce pistol, and likely the most widely issued during the Napoleonic era and until production of the M.1809 could supplant it.
   $3,000    
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1906) A Fine Venetian Schiavona c. 1725. 38", double-edged blade with broad central fuller extending to within 5" of tip. Etched both sides at forte with "VIVAT / CAROLUS VI / ROMISCHER / KAYSER" (Charles VI of Austria-Hungary, Holy Roman Emperor, 1711-40), under Imperial Austrian double-headed eagle surmounted by crown. Entire remainder of fuller etched with gilded designs. An expensive and powerful blade. Hilt of Type 2 style, retaining much original gilding (to match the gilding on blade), brass cat's head pommel with face of mustachioed warrior. Grip retains all original shagreen wrap.Sword in fine condition overall, no restoration or repairs. This outstanding Schiavona is the exact one illustrated in Ewart Oakeshott's "European Weapons and Armour", pl.15C (see pics), first published in 1980. Oakeshott's somewhat whimsical remarks comparing Schiavona B with C can be disregarded; indeed, even his own text (p.187) allows these type 2 hilts were constructed far into the 18th century, so there is absolutely no reason to wonder why a basket that could easily date to the period 1711 - 40 could mount a blade made in the same era. See item # 1485 above, my list, for another Austrian blade dated 1734 also on a type 2 Schiavona basket, as well as a logical reason such blades do turn up on Schiavona hilts of this era. I sold this sword, # 1485, some years ago, and returned it to the site for comparison.   $5,500    
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1907) A Victorian Era Italian Cinquedea Dagger in the style of the 16th Century. 12 1/2", 3 1/4" wide (at guard) blade etched classical motif of Hercules with club, suits of armour, etc., stippled background retains traces of gilding; a thin 3/4" sliver of the blade edge missing on one side (see pics). Crossguard of characteristic cinquedea type with downturned quillons etched ensuite with blade. Cinquedea-form grip of ebony with etched brass collar. If this were from Renaissance Italy, it would be worth at least 30 times as much.    $425    
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1910) Imperial Russian Model 1809/39 Pistol. 10 1/2", .70 cal. barrel stamped with Imperial double-headed eagle enclosed in a punch-mark over cypher of Czar Nicholas I, and marking "No=17", (note: Russian caliber designation was "7 Line", a Line equaling one tenth of an inch). Lock marked "TULA" / 1848"; in excellent working order. Brass mounted solid stock, no cracks, repairs, or restoration. Wrist bears oval escutcheon with cypher of Nicholas I. Barrel band with slight damage, not repaired (see pic). Stock retains nearly all original black paint, which seems to have been a characteristic of Russian firearms used in the Crimea. The half stock 1809/39 was introduced in 1839, and many earlier 1809 pistols were modified to this version. Being dated 1848, this example was manufactured from new as a half stock. This was also the year the enormous and clumsy Model 1848 Enlisted Man's percussion pistol was introduced. All original, in fine condition.      Reduced to $3,000    
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1911) Rare Imperial Russian Model 1849 Enlisted Man's Pistol, System Delvigne. 7 1/4", .675 cal. smoothbore barrel stamped with inspector''s mark, "No 103" (serial #), date "1850", mark of Tula Weapons Factory, and double-headed eagle of Imperial Russia. Swivel ramrod of unique design. Lock of Delvigne design with sharply angled profile, also marked with Cyrillic letters of Tula Weapons Factory, and date "1850". Lock in fine working order. Iron mounted stock in fine condition, no cracks, repairs or restoration, retains most original finish. Buttcap with lanyard ring that can be pushed in to unscrew the cover of a spare cap compartment - a feature also seen occasionally on French officers'' pistols of this period. Overall condition is VG+, barrel has light pitting patina that does not seriously detract. These pistols were made in four versions, differing in the length of the barrel and whether rifled or smoothbore: 1) short barrel, smoothbore, 2) short barrel, rifled, 3)long barrel, smoothbore, 4)long barrel, rifled. The rifled versions were introduced in 1854 for officers only (F.Datig, article "Russian Military Firearms, The Imperial Era" in Gun Collector''s Digest, 5th edition, pp.14-29). This pistol is the short barrel, smoothbore version. A very scarce Russian service pistol, as well as a very unconventional design.    $3,000    
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1914) Magnificent Cased Gibbs-Farquharson Target Rifle. 35 1/4" barrel (from receiver front; 35 3/4" from breech face); caliber .461 Gibbs, marked "METFORD'S PATENT, 679. GEORGE GIBBS, 29, CORN STREET, BRISTOL" ; Birmingham proofs, "48", and crown over "BP". Rear sight ladder to 1000 yards. Removable fore- sight with spring-loaded detention. Sight base designed to fit windage adjustable globe sights in case (see sights below). Barrel retains 80% fine original blue, balance drifting to smooth plum. Bore is mint, bright with 7-groove Metford rifling like new. Receiver right side marked "FARQUHARSON'S / PATENT / 68" (68 is action serial number); left side "GEORGE GIBBS / BRISTOL". Tang fitted with base for long range match sight (also in case with other sights - all original and provided with rifle by Gibbs). Action is in crisp, like new working order, and retains much original muted case color. Ex.+ stocks, sharp checkering, no cracks, repairs or alterations, never re-finished, and everywhere with a perfect wood-to-metal fit. Grooved horn buttplate also ex. Sights include windage adjustable hooded fore-sight with 4 different inserts. The long range vernier rear sight (4 1/8" high) that fits on the wrist base is marked "GEORGE GIBBS / BRISTOL". All these sights are identical to those shown in their original sight case illustrated in Wal Winfer's "British Single Shot Rifles, Vol.2", p.63, including the fact that the eye cup has a female thread that engages the male thread on the sight staff (contrary to usual practice). All sights in ex. like new condition. The case is completely original as supplied by Gibbs, as is the original trade label "GEORGE GIBBS / GUN MAKER / 2 CORN STREET / BRISTOL / SOL MANUFACTURER of the METFORD PATENT RIFLE / etc. It includes an original oil bottle, some loading dies, powder measure, and a very old and faded tag reading (as best I can make out) "3 1/2 (?) / 90 GRAINS"; must be loading instructions. With it is an old business card of "J.LEONARD BROWN, MANAGER / W.RICHARDS (L'POOL) LTD / etc.,etc" . This rifle apparently sold by Westley Richards c. 1950-60's? The old brown tag with loading instructions is much earlier. The unlined wood case is entirely correct. See p.50, Winfer, for an identical unlined case with label, containing a Gibbs-Farquharson target rifle with an action identical to this one. Its action serial # is 66, and it is the earliest target Gibbs the author knows of. Case is in ex. condition, no repairs and none needed, leather straps and grip in good condition. A remarkably complete rifle and case, all in untouched original condition. The Gibbs - Farquharson was far and away the leading target rifle of its day in the UK, and this one is both early and in splendid condition.   $10,000  
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1916) Imperial Russian Model 1752-1808 Cavalry Pistol. 11 1/2" , .67 cal. barrel stamped with indistinct inspectors' marks, brass foresight. Lock marked "TULA / 1803". Ex. working order. Solid brass mounted stock, no repairs or restoration, only a few minor service dings and minor worming mostly on grip that does not detract. Brass mounts with inspectors' marks, wrist escutcheon plate engraved with cypher of Czar Alexander I. With the likely exception of the iron ramrod (seems old), all parts are original. See above item # 1904 for further details regarding the 1752-1808 Pattern. A fine and rare early Russian pistol.    $3,800    
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1917) French Model 1866-74 Gras. 31 1/2" barrel, 11X59R cal., many inspectors' poincons, dated S.1876, serial # 50889. Matching #'s 50889 on bayonet lug, ramrod, bolt and all bolt parts, stock, an all-matching gun. Receiver marked "MANUFACTURE D ARMES / ST ETIENNE / M.-1866-74". Converted from a Chassepot, the stock exhibits the original Chassepot rondel & date on the obverse, the conversion markings on the reverse. Condition is Fine+ overall, complete even to the correct sling. Receiver and barrel retain nearly all original blue applied at time of conversion (Chassepots were issued in the white, but the Gras rifles were blued). the bore is mint, action is in perfect working order. Stock is solid, no cracks or repairs, never cleaned, deep clear markings, only minor service dings. A good example of the Gras rifle.    $775  
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1918) French Mannlicher-Berthier Artillery Musketoon Model 1892. 16 7/8" barrel, 8mm Lebel cal., serial # 76807, dated "MAS 1895". Receiver marked "St. ETIENNE Mle 1892". Action in perfect working order, matching bolt #76807. Bore is ex. with sharp, bright rifling. Fine solid stock, never cleaned, no cracks or repairs, stock rondel dated 1895. All #'s matching - barrel, bolt, stock, trigger guard/magazine plate. Cleaning rod # does not match. Barrel and receiver retain 95% original fine smooth blue, all markings deep and clear. It is rare to find these early Berthier carbines in original, unaltered condition. The only modification this carbine (and virtually every other carbine) received was the provision of a new backsight ladder in 1898, calibrated to conform with the improved ballistics of the "Balle D" cartridge adopted in that year.. In later years, nearly all carbines were fitted with 5-shot magazines, wood hand guards and new barrel bands to hold them, stacking hooks, cleaning rod channels filled in, etc. Some, like the original M-1890, had their near full-stocks shortened to fit a new muzzle band to take a bayonet. The M-1892 Artillery Carbine was designed from inception to fit a bayonet.

Note:This is not an Afghan bring-back, it comes from a more than 50 year old collection. There are, of course, no import markings.
   $1,100    
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1919) British Kynoch Conversion of French Chassepot. Standard length Chassepot barrel 31 1/2"; original French serial # 98474 on chamber and bayonet bar, post 1856 Birmingham proofs; marked "KYNOCH - GUN - FACTORY - ASTON", and "MUSKET - 43 - 77". Action marked "KYNOCHS - PATENT" , much modified bolt matching # 98474. Action in ex. working order, bore is mint. Gun retains virtually all original conversion blue applied by Kynoch. It is apparent the barrel was converted to centre-fire cartridge the same way the French converted a Chassepot into a Gras - with a chamber insert. But, it was not for the 11X59R Gras round, instead it chambered the 11mm (43 Mauser). I tried a 43 Mauser case and it fitted and extracted perfectly. While neither the Chassepot or the German Dreyse needle rifle systems represented by 1870 the most modern military technology, there is no doubt the Chassepot was more accurate and greatly out-ranged the Dreyse. The Germans were so impressed by this fact that when they hurriedly adopted the 1871 Mauser, they simply borrowed the 11mm caliber and rifling system of the Chassepot in toto, and this explains why Kynoch could utilize the 43 Mauser cartridge. It seems these rifles were a commercial venture by a spin-off of the Kynoch Cartridge Co., for sale to any and all interested parties. They may well have come from the many seized by the Germans after their victory in the Franco-Prussian War, and were generally considered by them as useless surplus. An interesting gun which you don't see very often.   $575  
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1920) British Martini-Henry MkIII Infantry Rifle dated 1879. Standard 32 1/2" barrel (measured to receiver), 577-450 cal., correct British military proofs. Receiver markings "CROWN / VR / ENFIELD / 1879 / inspector's stamp / III / 1". On reverse side, standard military proofs. Solid uncleaned stocks, no cracks or repairs, usual minor service dings. Buttstock marked in rondel, " Broad Arrow under Crown, RM Enfield, III, 1" (this last indicating a 1st class arm). Original sling swivels and ramrod.
Action is in tight ex. working order; bore is mint. Gun is complete as issued, smooth metal overall with much original blue on barrel, partly drifting to light age patina; all markings deep and clear. A good, all-original M-H MkIII.

Note: 1879 is a Zulu War date.
   $975  
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1921) Royal Navy Sea Service Short Musket. 26", .77 cal. barrel, marked with Government proofs of "Crown / GR / Broad Arrow", also "IVR" and "Crown over crossed sceptres". The bayonet stud is missing, its position indicated by a thin line of brazing. India pattern post-1809 lock marked "TOWER, Crown over GR" and with lock inspector's stamp of "Crown over Broad Arrow". Lock is in fine positive working order, all original parts including top jaw and screw. Markings overall are clear and deep.
Solid brass-mounted stock stamped with storekeeper's mark Crown over Broad Arrow over date 18?? (indistinct). Two inspectors' stamps in usual place behind trigger guard tang. Original rammer and sling swivels. The thick, flat brass buttplate with it's beveled edges can be seen in Blackmore's illustration.
A Sea Service Short musket of exactly this pattern in all respects is illustrated in Blackmore's "British Military Firearms", p.100, pl. 22, entitled "Black Sea Service Muskets" . It has the same 26" barrel and New Land style buttstock. It is period painted on the butt "MUSQt SHORT / S.S." Except for the painted nomenclature, this SS Short I offer here could have posed for the plate. Blackmore dates it at c. 1820, made of surplus parts. The marking MR on the barrel appears on other British military guns of this period, and conjecture has interpreted it as a perhaps a copy of the French "Manufacture Royale" , or, "IVR" for "IVRex" (ie., King William IV).
   $1,600    
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1922) Cased pair Irish Deringers by Holland, Dublin c.1835-40. 2 3/4", .55 cal. barrels marked "DUBLIN" and stamped with registration markings "DU 35" and "DU 36". Swivel rammers. Back action locks marked "HOLLAND" (William Holland, worked Dublin 1820-46). Ex. crisp working order. Solid stocks, never cleaned, no cracks or repairs, fine checkered bag grips, retain 80% original varnish, engraved iron mounts. VG+/Fine overall condition, small areas minor stain & pitting - bear in mind that unlike cased duellers, pistols like this were often carried every day, for Ireland was an unhappy place for many, with sectarian violence commonplace. The barrel registration markings were applied by authorities according to a Parliamentary Act of 1843 (applicable only in Ireland) that all guns of any type were to be registered and numbered, with two letters denoting the County - "DU" for Dublin, "AN" for Antrim, and so on. The Act remained in force until 1846, by which time the Potato Famine of 1845-46 had starved over a million to death, and precipitated the emigration of millions more, considerably reducing the endemic election violence and rioting common before 1843. Case retains all original green baize lining, and is unusual in having compartment covers. Accessories include an original screwdriver, two identical type molds, one marked "26", the other "30". One compartment shows the gray impressions of oxidized balls, another contains a fine, small copper powder flask. Case lid has a thin repaired crack along the upper edge, no wood replaced. A good pair of self defense pistols from a turbulent and sorrowful era of Irish history.    $3,250  
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1923) A Good Quality and Interesting English Pepperbox by Edward London. 3 1/4" , .40 cal., fluted 6-shot barrel cluster made from a single block of steel, each barrel stamped with tiny Birmingham proof. Each of the six sighting ribs tapers toward the muzzle to a German silver bead - an unnecessary but nice bit of prideful workmanship. Engraved German silver frame is marked on the backstrap "E.LONDON / 51 LONDON WALL" (Edward London worked first at 50 London Wall, then at 51 London Wall 1832-66). Engraved steel trigger guard; buttcap with hinged capbox. Action in ex. crisp working order, best described as a top-action version of the Mariette or Cooper straight-line underhammer design. Finely diced grips, never refinished, no cracks or repairs. A fine quality and somewhat unusual English pepperbox in a larger caliber than usually encountered   $1,150    
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1925) A Group of three pieces of Scottish Regimental Regalia. 1) A late Victorian white metal piper's plaid brooch of the 42nd, Black Watch Regiment. St. Andrew, "NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT", and Sphinx over "EGYPT". 2) A gilt and silvered shoulder belt plate of the Gordon Highlanders c. 1900. Sphinx over "Egypt", stag head over Crown surrounded by "GORDON HIGHLANDERS", lion over "INDIA". 3) Piper's belt plate of the Canadian "PERTH REGIMENT", "AUDAX ET CAUTUS", both plate and badge with thistle ornamentation. Circa WW I era. The group of three:    $375  
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1927) English Officer's Pistol c. 1810. 8 1/4", .65 caliber (carbine bore), heavy octagonal twist barrel, hook breech, platinum vent and inlaid line at breech, engraved "LONDON". Bolted lock with roller frizzen spring, engraved "T.BOLTON & Co" (the "O" partially covered by tip of frizzen spring). Ex. working order, though the bolted safety needs oil. Topjaw and screw probably replaced, but both are definitely old. Stock retains much original varnish, fine checkered bag grip, engraved iron mounts. There is a thin, almost imperceptible 1" crack in the right side forestock. Smooth, clean metal overall. The swivel rammer and heavy barrel in carbine bore identify this as an officer's saddle pistol.    $1,750  
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1928) A Fine Double Barrel Pistol by William Bond, London. 5 1/2", .57 cal. twist barrels with platinum vents and double gold lines at hook breech, center rib engraved "W.BOND 59 LOMBARD ST. LONDON". (William Bond at this address 1823-45, Stockel p.120) Engraved, bolted locks with waterproof pans, roller frizzen springs, engraved "W.BOND", in perfect, crisp working order, original top jaws and screws. Fine solid stock, never refinished, no cracks or repairs, checkered grip, engraved iron mounts, silver barrel key mounts and vacant wrist escutcheon. Original ramrod. Smooth metal overall, all markings, engraving very clear. A gun of fine quality and condition, all-original. William Bond was a member of one of the most famous London gunmaking dynasties, founded in 1768 and flourishing for over a century.    $4,250    
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1929) British Volunteer Rifled Cavalry Carbine by Henry Nock. 28" barrel, .72 cal smoothbore for 3 1/2" at muzzle, after that rifled with 7 grooves in .65 cal, carbine bore. Bore is bright, sharp, mint. Foresight is a robust bead, rear is a fixed blade V. Not intended for use with bayonet. 2 3/4" octagonal Nock's form at breech, engraved "LONDON No 16", London view and proof marks. Hook breech.
Lock in ex. crisp working order, powerful springs, engraved "H.NOCK". Original top jaw and screw. Brass mounted stock in ex. condition with crisp edges, never refinished, no cracks or repairs, shows almost no wear or service dings, fitted with sling bar and ring. Trigger guard engraved "C / YC" (see below), original heavy ramrod swollen near head to secure in stock, brass cupped end, fully slit stock with ramrod end fitting into a tail pipe formed by the trigger guard finial. A heavy duty iron round-eye is screwed into the lower butt near toe of the buttplate.
I am indebted to Chisnall & Davies "British Cavalry Carbines & Pistols of the Napoleonic Era", p.162 and illustrations p.171, for publishing a completely identical in every respect Nock carbine ("London No 3; H.Nock; C/YC), and describing the same 3 1/2" smoothbore .72 cal. muzzle transitioning to 7-groove carbine bore, 28" barrel, etc. The two rifles differ only in their serial numbers, and the fact that #3 does not have an eye-ring in the buttstock.
The "C/YC" has been interpreted as the Castlemartin Yeomanry Cavalry, which became the first Volunteer Cavalry regiment to win a battle honour,"Fishguard", by participating in 1797 in repelling a French invasion force which landed at Fishguard, Pembrokeshire. Yeomanry, Fencibles, and Militia skirmished with the French who soon decided that discretion was the better part of valour - they had invaded believing that England was in a state of insurrection and that they would lead a vast mob in a march on London. When it proved to be very much otherwise, the French surrendered at Goodwin Sands, ending the last invasion of the British mainland.
Another possible meaning of C / YC is Cobham Yeomanry Cavalry, in Kent. The Royal Armouries have an identical example of these Nock carbines which came from the sale of Cobham Hall, seat of the Earls of Darnley, which the family was forced to sell in 1957, victims of revengeful and ruthless death duties and taxes.
In the late 18th century, the Darnleys would certainly found it within their means and interest to raise and equip a troop of Yeomanry Cavalry, and indeed there was a Cobham Yeomanry Cavalry from 1794.
Overall condition is VG+ to near Fine, entirely original in every respect, with even light pitting on barrel and sling bar, ex. working order.
   $7,400  
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1930) US 1808 Contract Musket by Owen & Edward Evans. 44 5/8" , .69 cal. barrel stamped in oval proof "Eagle over C.T.", and "V". Lock stamped with "Eagle over US" (upper part of eagle weak as result of poorly struck die), tail stamped "EVANS". Lock in ex. working order. Untouched dark stock in fine+ / ex. condition, only a very few minor dings, no cracks, repairs or restoration of any sort. Counter-lock area stamped "H H P over V" , the initials of Henry H. Perkin, Federal inspector. Left side buttstock lightly carved with soldier's initials "H V". All metal bears an untouched, smooth age patina, no pitting just a little surface roughness on small areas of barrel. With exception of lock eagle mentioned above, all markings deep and clear. All parts are original, including top jaw and screw, sling swivels and ramrod (which is stamped with a "W" near head, and threaded for tool). According to their 1808 contract, the Evans brothers were given two muskets with bayonets made at Harper's Ferry as the pattern to copy in "....form, kind, dimensions, quality and substance...". It appears the final deliveries from Evans were in 1813, with a total of 1712 stand of arms. In "United States Martial Flintlocks", p.81, author Robert M. Reilly states "Few muskets of Evan's manufacture have survived". This musket is a fine, all-original example in a condition rarely encountered.   $2,500    
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1931) Rare Imperial Russian Hussar Saber, Mid to Late 18th Century. 34 1/2" heavy blade with broad central fuller, etched both sides with prancing hussar under banner "V. HUSSAR" (Vivat Hussar). The back near the hilt is marked "SOLINGEN" in Cyrillic. Brass hilt with lion-head pommel, engraved with flower on cross-guard, and decoration on quillon. The knucklebow is partly bent out of shape. Grip wrapped with original black leather covering. The scabbard is wood covered with original leather, three brass mounts. The chape bears campaign scars, and above it the leather and wood of the scabbard is somewhat damaged, though still intact with no attempt at repair or restoration.
Search online "Russian Hussar Saber". You will find several sites that illustrate examples with the identical hilt- so much so, you could beleive they were made in the same workshop.
This is an all original 18th century Russian Hasar Sword.
   $4,000    
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1932) British Rifle of Musket Length by Durs Egg, ex- Jac Weller and Peter Wainwright Collections. 39", .72 cal. barrel deeply rifled with 9 grooves, foresight also functions as bayonet stud, backsight is single standing V blade, London view and proofmarks, engraved "D - EGG - LONDON". Bore in fine condition with clear, sharp grooves. Lock marked Crown over "GR", tail "D. EGG". Ex. crisp working order, original top jaw and screw. Fine brass mounted stock, never cleaned, virtually no dings, minor hairline grain crack behind lock tail is almost invisible with no attempt at repair, original sling swivels. Heavy rammer passes down slit stock (like some Baker rifles) to a tail pipe formed by an extension of the trigger guard. Metal has a smooth light age patina overall, no pitting, a fine and obviously untouched gun. A brass tag on the t.g. reads "WELLER COLLECTION / Princeton R.I. / 328". This exact gun is illustrated in Howard Blackmore's "British Military Firearms", p.146, pl.39, with the same heavy rammer and with attribution to the "Collection of Jac Weller, Esq.". On p.111, Blackmore states that from 1796-98, Nock, Grice, and Egg submitted rifle patterns to Ordnance, but that only Egg appeared to have received a contract. In May, 1796, the Board of Ordnance agreed to pay Egg 3 Pounds, 15 Shillings, for each "rifle musquet" (sic). An important example of a rifle that figured in the eventual adoption of the Baker rifle.    $4,500  
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1933) A Fine British Volunteer Rifle by George Daw. 32 1/4", .577 cal. heavy barrel turned round at muzzle to accept a yataghan bayonet, hook breech, a full-length sighting flat from breech to muzzle ( upper inside of barrel bands contoured to conform to this flat); London proofs underside; engraved "GEORGE H. DAW 57 THREADNEEDLE St. LONDON". Regulation type rear sight to permit the rifle to be used in military / militia matches. The bore is absolutely bright mint. Lock with border engraving and "G. DAW". Lock in perfect crisp working order, secured by a single side nail like many a fine sporting rifle of the period. Solid, ex. condition stock, no cracks or repairs, retains 95% original varnish, sharp unworn checkering on wrist and forearm, sharp edges to wood. Vacant silver escutcheon on wrist. Original sling swivels and ramrod with brass tip to reduce wear on rifling, threaded on end for cleaning tools. Smooth, muted original blue on all metal, all markings sharp as new. An untouched gun of high original quality, and ex. condition, especially desirable with a mint bore.    $2,500    
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1934) British Cavalry Rifle Attributed to the Hompesch Hussars. 30 1/4", .65 cal. barrel rifled with 7 grooves, brass foresight and folding leaf rear sight, bayonet stud under muzzle, Tower proofs , hook breech, bore in VG condition with clear and distinct rifling. Lock marked with Crown over "GR", "TOWER" on tail, roller frizzen spring, top jaw and screw original, in ex. working order. Brass mounted stock with sling bar and ring (correct for this pattern), wrist with escutcheon plate engraved "H H". Original sling swivels and ramrod. Trigger guard engraved "39". A completely identical "H H" rifle, numbered "33" on the trigger guard, is illustrated in Chisnall & Davies "British Cavalry Carbines and Pistols of the Napoleonic Era", p.173, where it is described as "A Baker Cavalry Rifle". The entire length of the barrel bears uniform medium pitting, as does also the sling bar. However, this pitting is so uniform and relatively shallow that a careful draw filing could greatly improve the appearance. Note that the Tower proofs are still identifiable. The lock has fared much better because it was certainly heat-treated, and not of dead-soft iron as is the barrel. The two lock screws (side nails) are replacements. The stock has been cleaned, and has some sort of fill around the obverse tail pipe and the obverse middle barrel key slot. In the "Monthly Army List" of August 1798, the Hompesch Hussars were described as "A Regiment of Mounted Riflemen" and this, in spite of their title of Hussars, is how they were described in the List until their disbandment in 1802. Research accompanies the rifle - see some of it in pics. Yes, I am aware that the meaning of "H H" has been questioned, but I leave that debate to others. What is not in question is the fact that this is a British rifle of c.1800 intended for use by mounted troopers. And yes, the condition could be better (though it is certainly capable of improvement), but the price reflects that.    $3,200    
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1935) British Pattern 1796 Heavy Cavalry Pistol. 9" , .770 cal. barrel with Government proofs Crown over GR over Broad Arrow, and Crown over Crossed Sceptres. Lock marked "TOWER", Crown over "GR", lock inspector's mark Crown over Broad Arrow. Lock in working order, but will only hold full cock, not 1/2. Stock is in good condition, but has apparently been cleaned; brass mounts; trigger guard engraved "COL / 57" ( meaning unknown to me). Ramrod is a good replacement.    $1,250  
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1936) British Martini-Henry Mk.II Infantry Rifle. Standard Mk.II in all respects; 32 1/2" barrel; .577-.450 cal.; correct Crown military proofs; ex.+ bore, bright with sharp rifling, like new. Barrel stamped by backsight "NS / NEP" , marking indicating "Native Service / Nepal". Action in ex. working order; marked with "Crown over "VR" / BSA Co / 1889 / Crown over BA / II / 1". Original sling swivels and ramrod. Buttstock stamped with Enfield rondel over "II / 1" (Mk.II; First Class Reserve) The rondel of the Allahabad Arsenal also appears nearby, and this would account for the rifle being arsenal refinished. Most of this blue remains in fine condition, just slightly worn, and turning light plum in places. Many of these M-H rifles were turned over to Nepal in later years, as the "NS / NEP" indicates, and several Nepalese characters, apparently unit numerals, appear on the reverse buttstock. A good example of a rifle of Empire, from a hotly contested era and place, in far better condition than most now coming out of Nepal.    $900  
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1937) Russian Cossack / Caucasian Kindjal, 19th Century. 15", sharp double-edged, multi-fuller blade struck with a typical Muslim armourer's mark. A light damascus pattern appears over the entire surface. Hilt of black horn, mounted with silver niello domed rivets. Silver scabbard mounts decorated with fine quality inlaid niello designs; leather covering over wood core in fine condition. Blade is in ex. condition, clean and smooth, no pitting, with the alternating irregular layers of damascus undulating lengthwise down the blade in varied shades of light gray. This does appear to be genuine mechanical damascus; in any event, it's certainly not the boring, artificial whorls of acid etched fake "bulat". Fine overall condition.    $650  
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1938) Italian Cabasset, Late 16th Century. Munitions grade, though of good form and construction, skull and brim being entirely formed from a single piece of steel. At 10 3/4", the skull is slightly higher and more prominent than many. Brim has typical turned over roped edge; original domed brass rivets secure ancient buff leather liner that shows evidence of chin strap placement. Retains original plume holder. Has only a few tiny dents, no repairs or damage. A good and honest example of a widely used 16th - early 17th century munitions grade helmet. Many contemporary woodcuts / illustrations depict Spanish, French, Dutch, etc., soldiers wearing just such cabassets "interacting" with American Native peoples. Widely used all over Europe as well as America.

Note: Cabasset means "pear" in Italian, and the little point at the peak represents the fruit's stem !
   $1,500    
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1939) Moghul Indian Helmet ("Top") and Matching Shield ("Sipar"), 18th, Early 19th Century. Fluted steel helmet of expert armourer's craftsmanship, skull decorated with intricate and fine quality designs in silver and gold koftgari. The finely executed Arabic gold inscriptions around the brim are true inlays, not koftgari. Helmet fitted with plume holders, the usual spike on top being a large plume holder as well. The small hook that secures the nasal in the up position is missing, but very easily replaced. The mail neck-guard (camail) is of ring-butt mail, and in ex.+ condition. The Sipar (14 1/2" dia.) is decorated ensuite with the helmet, in fine condition retaining most gold and silver koftgari, as well as the original fabric backing (somewhat frayed, but nothing serious). A quality matched pair.    $2,800  
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1940) A Fine Kurdish Silver Jambiya. 9 1/2" double-edged blade of light gray wootz damascus, or, if you prefer Persian "Poulad Jauharder" (the name that entered Russian as "Bulat"). Blade is clean and in fine condition. Hilt and scabbard entirely of finely worked high grade silver, the hilt bedecked with many small silver pendants. A heavy dagger with an overall length of 19 1/2" . A dagger of this uniquely characteristic type is shown in Stone's Glossary, p.313, fig.396, #10, identified as Turkish; another in Tirri "Islamic Weapons", p.95, fig. 56A, is listed as Kurdish. There is an understandable but deceptive conflict of identity here - the national status of Kurdistan is being worked out in conflict today, with Turkey continuing to claim a suzerainty or at least interest over part of the Kurdish homeland, dating from the days of the Ottoman Empire. A fine dagger of quality.    $1,250    
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1941) An 18th Century Indian Talwar of Extremely Fine Quality and Condition. 28 1/2" blade, heavy, powerful, and sharp, of beautifully worked mechanical damascus (pattern welded, not wootz), extremely well forged, absolutely dead-straight, with perfect uniform lines. Blade widens toward the point, with a 10" false edge, and retains 99%+ of its pronounced watered pattern just slightly faded on one side near the point for 1" or so. A bladesmith's mark of addorsed archery bows is incised into the blade, and inlaid with enamel. No pitting or oxidation, never cleaned, just maintained very well by its owners over the years. The pics can speak for themselves. Hilt and scabbard mounts retain 99% original heavy gold koftgari of finest quality in near like-new condition, just a tiny bit of wear and patina - for example, on the extreme bottom end of the chape. Wood core scabbard covered in the usual Indian fashion in velvet, seam covered in silver thread tape, again in the usual manner. The velvet shows only minor wear and fading, some small scars on reverse. Swords of this quality were much treasured in India, handed down and carefully preserved over the generations.    $3,800  
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1942) French Mannlicher - Berthier Model 1890 Cavalry Carbine. 16 3/4' barrel (measured to receiver ring), 8mm Lebel cal., backsight altered in 1898 for "Balle D" ammunition (see # 1918 above). Barrel markings "MA C 1892" (year of manufacture), various inspection poincons, serial # A 49283. Receiver marked "CHATELLERAULT Mle 1890". Action in ex. working order; bore is ex.+, bright with sharp rifling. Solid stock in ex. original condition, never cleaned, almost no service dings, deep clear markings "A 49283", rondel dated "AVRIL (April) 1892". Within several years of issue, the cavalry complained of the sling ring on the barrel band and the sling swivel on the underside of the buttstock. All carbines already in service (like this one) and all those subsequently manufactured were altered to a fixed bar on the barrel band and a sling bar inlet to the side of the reverse buttstock. The swivel base in the buttstock was filled with a wood insert (see pics). Serial # A 49283 appears on the barrel, ramrod, bolt, stock, and magazine floorplate ahead of trigger guard - an all-matching gun.

Condition is VG to Fine overall, retains nearly all original blue (not an arsenal re-conditioning), some areas of surface oxidation and dried grease stain.
Some experts have derided the 3-shot Berthier carbine for its modest magazine capacity, without considering a number of factors. First, it could be reloaded very rapidly with its Mannlicher enblock clip, and trials with experimental Model 1886 Lebel carbines had shown that with their much shortened barrels and tubular magazines consequently much reduced in capacity, they were both difficult and slow to load on horseback, and too heavy into the bargain with their heavy steel receivers. Further, French cavalry regarded their lances and swords as by far their principal weapons, and the handy little 3-shot Berthier was perfectly suitable. They had not the experience learned the hard way by the British in the Boer War that any cavalry carbine (let alone the 5-shot Lee Enfield or Metford) was pretty much dead weight, and that realization had lead to the SMLE, which was developed for all branches of the service. When the appalling reality of the First World War became apparent, and that cavalry, men and horses, was but fodder for German Maxims, the French - lacking the resources to re-arm their mostly dismounted cavalry with infantry rifles - began to modify their carbines.

With the exception of the two mods mentioned above, this carbine remains in its pre-WW I condition, and somehow escaped all the modifications applied during or after the Great War. It is very unusual to encounter an early Berthier in its original configuration (again, see # 1918 above). The Model 1890 Berthier cavalry carbine was the first of millions of various Berthier models to be produced.
   $1,300    
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1943) Wilkinson Experimental Underhammer Military Trials Musket, Patented in 1839. 39", .75 cal., marked "WILKINSONS PATENT", double-struck Broad Arrows indicating sale from Crown Stores, London view and proof marks ( the view stamp partially overstruck with # "5" ). Barrel fitted with backsight, bayonet stud and Hanoverian catch. Bore is bright, smooth like new; barrel has a light and even patina overall; all markings clear. Action in perfect working order, and is simplicity itself - the hammer is its own spring, and the trigger is the sear as well. The long iron plate ahead of the trigger guard incorporates an a circular cup for the nipple, and serves as a base to secure the ring hammer spring, is marked "WILKINSON PATENT". This can only be seen when the hammer is cocked. Trigger guard is brass, as are all the other mounts on the ex.+ stock - no cracks, repairs, never cleaned, almost no signs of wear or use. Obverse butt stamped "ICR". Original sling swivels and rammer.

The Wilkinson musket was given a 1000 round Trial in 1840, but was not adopted. On p.175, pl. 53, of Blackmore's "British Military Firearms", a completely identical Wilkinson musket is illustrated. An interesting, well-made, and ex. condition example of a gun of the early percussion era, before designs settled down to generally accepted types.
   $4,100  
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1944) North West Mounted Police Winchester Model 1876 Carbine. Standard length 22" barrel (measured from breech face), correct "Spanish Meter" rear sight, full correct Winchester address on barrel, marked "45-75 / WCF" over chamber. Barrel retains most original blue now drifting to smooth plum. Bore in fine bright condition with distinct sharp rifling. Receiver tang marked "MODEL 1876", brass elevator marked "45-75". Receiver never cleaned, has VG+ original smooth, untouched surface. Action is in unusually ex.+ crisp working order, given the service conditions these carbines were subjected to. Screwheads everywhere in ex. unbuggered condition. Stocks never cleaned or sanded, have usual service dings. The crescent "NWMP" is quite visible. Serial # 45378, according to factory letter, "rec'd in warehouse" April 18, 1885 and shipped the same day. This haste was occasioned by the Riel Rebellion of March-July, 1885, in Western Canada. Number 45378 appears on Klancher's list of NWMP carbines, see pics of this and factory letter which will accompany gun. The wood of the butt just behind the lower tang has been lightly scraped to remove the "APP" or "LOF" marking (Alberta Provincial Police or Legion of Frontiersmen, organizations that obtained these arms after the RNWMP moved on to more modern rifles). Being from the Western Great White North, I have owned and sold at least 10 or more of the NWMP carbines, and have seen this before. Apparently, after the APP or LOF turned to modern weapons, some of their personal simply absconded with the 1876 carbines, effacing the lettering to avoid possibly embarrassing questions in the hunting camp! I have never seen one carbine with an obliterated serial #. On p.228 of "The Winchester Book" by George Madis, 1st Edition, you can see an APP marking that has clearly been partially removed. I have never known the presence or absence or removal of an APP or LOF marking to in any way effect the value of an NWMP carbine - it is the NWMP mark in the stock and the verified NWMP serial # that matters. This is an all-original NWMP carbine in better condition than most.    $7,500  
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1945) A Good Pair of Genuine Colt .45 Automatic Grips. From a 4-digit Colt auto that had sadly been reworked into a target pistol - enlarged ejection port, adjustable rear and target-type fore sight, reblued. Work probably done 1950's. Owner at that time retained these grips on gun, but present owner elected to fit modern grips and sold the originals to me. No cracks, chips, or repairs, just modest honest wear as can be seen in pics.    $175  
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1946) A Fine English Cavalry Sword of the Civil Wars Era, c. 1640-50. 34 1/2" stiff, double-edged blade of flattened lozenge cross-section. Double shell hilt, outer shell with lightly engraved cusped edge in cockle-shell style; the inner shell with thumb ring. Quillon of typical form, extending back through thickened cross-guard with two piercings either side, continuing to knuckle-bow with median shell-form swelling. Large globular pommel with knuckle-bow and side knuckle-guard from outer shell secured by screws in the same manner as mortuary swords. Original grip with original twisted iron wire wrap in good condition. Sword has no damage or restoration.
In modern parlance, this type is referred to by some as "Proto - Mortuary", in the belief it somewhat preceded the mortuary hilt. In "Arms and Armour of the English Civil Wars", p.28, author David Blackmore states that this "....remains to be proven and they were certainly in use simultaneously". He also provides illustrations of a number of very similar examples exhibiting the characteristics of this sword.
This exact sword (not merely similar, but the identical and same sword) appears in 2 views in fig.16, p.14, of Robert Brooker's "British Military Pistols and Associated Edged Weapons". I should know, I bought the sword from the author. The book is a large, 432 page, lavishly colour illustrated volume that will likely remain the "last word" for a very long time. A good and original sword of substantial construction, in fine condition.
   $3,200    
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1947) British Pattern 1799 Light Dragoon Pistol. 9", .65 caliber barrel with Government proofs "Crown /GR / Broad Arrow" and "Crown over crossed sceptres", and Crown inspector's stamp near touch hole; tang stamped with inspector's mark. Lock marked "TOWER", "Crown over GR" and inspector's stamp of Crown over Broad Arrow. Lock in ex., crisp working order. Ex., solid, uncleaned stock, no repairs, cracks, or restoration. Clear inspectors' stamps alongside trigger guard tang, deep clear Storekeeper's stamp "Crown / GR / 1800" on upper wrist. Entirely original including iron rammer (correct for this model), and top jaw and screw, etc. All metal smooth dull steel patina; all markings deep and clear. Together with the somewhat later New Land pistol with its swivel rammer, the 1799 L.D. pistol was "the" Light Cavalry pistol of the Peninsular War You will see a dozen New Land pistols (a good, honest one costing from $1800 to $2000), for every one of these 1799 L.D. pistols, which were the last in a L.D. line of pistols that began with the Elliot Light Dragoon pistol of 1759. Consider too that the New Land Pattern was manufactured well after 1815, through the reigns of George IV and William IV. A very fine, all original in every respect Light Dragoon pistol.    $1,850    
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